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Google Wants Your Attention

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Google Wants Your Attention
2. Today's Top Story
    - Sony's Plan To Fix Infected Copy Protection Only Makes
      Matters Worse
    - ID Theft Numbers May Be Misleading
    - Newest Sober Attack Predicted By Police
    - IM Worms Mutating At An Alarming Rate
    - Keyloggers Jump 65% As Info Theft Goes Mainstream
    - Internet Security Market To Reach $58 Billion By 2010
    - Enterprises Patching Faster Than Ever, But Still Not Fast Enough
3. Breaking News
    - AOL Launching Online Video Of TV's Favorite Oldies
    - Willing To Pay $500 For 'Velvet Glove' Monthly Cell-Phone Service?
      Talk To Voce
    - Venture Firm To Acquire Serena Software For $1.2 Billion
    - Enterprise Content Management
    - Tucson And Calif. Town To Deploy Wi-Fi Muni Networks
    - Virginia Taps Northrop Grumman for $2 Billion IT Overhaul
    - Cisco Launches Enterprise Management, Mesh Products
    - CA Adds Service Availability And Management Platforms
    - EBay Makes Access To Its Web Services Free
    - U.N. Program Connects On Oracle Worldwide
4. In Depth
    - Gates Outlines Microsoft's High-Performance Computing Plans
    - Microsoft Readies Dynamics GP 9.0 ERP Platform
    - Microsoft Launches Free Enterprise Desktop-Search Tool
5. Voice Of Authority
    - Virginia Governor Opts For Onshore Outsourcing
6. White Papers
    - Secure Application Development
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Even he, to whom most things that most people would think were pretty smart were pretty dumb, thought it was pretty smart." -- Douglas Adams


1. Editor's Note: Google Wants Your Attention

The latest surprise from the frightfully smart folks at Google is that it's now offering enterprise-class Web analytics for free. Why would they do such a thing? They've decided that licensing fees are worth less money than the opportunity to find out what pages people are visiting, how long they're staying there, where they're coming from, and where they're going next. Google Analytics is another microscope Google can use to peer into what people are paying attention to.

It's just an extension of the real business that Google is in, which isn't search or E-mail or maps or even advertising. Rather, Google is in the attention business.

Most of us are in the attention business in one way or another. Most jobs consist of large amounts of getting other people to do what you want them to do. But before you can convince someone else to do things your way, you have to get their attention. You need to get some time on the boss's calendar, or to lure the potential customer into the store. Sometimes you need to hire a lawyer or call the cops just to get the other guy's attention.

The advertising business is the business of buying and selling attention in bulk quantities. Media outlets such as newspapers, TV, radio shows, and online periodicals get you to pay attention by giving you information you want. Then the media outlets turn around to the advertisers and say, "We have all these people paying attention to us. Give us some money and we'll slip your message in front of them."

Whereas the rest of us are trying to get other people to pay attention to us, Google seeks to find out what people are already paying attention to and get in front of them for a moment. That's how AdWords works; Google displays its advertising based on keywords in searches. Search Google for the word "golf," and you'll see ads for golf equipment, services, and resorts.

For Google, being in the attention business means it's of utmost importance to find out what people are paying attention to. To do that, Google has made a history of giving away services that other companies charge an arm and a leg for. Even more amazingly, the service that Google gives away is usually better than the services that other people are charging for. Gmail is a great mail client with 2 Gbytes of free storage. Likewise, Google Maps, Google Desktop search, and the Picasa desktop photo-organizer are first-rate implementations of what they do.

In exchange for that free service and software, Google wants to look over your shoulder and take notes on what you're paying attention to and what you're ignoring.

Right now, Google uses the attention information for one purpose: ads. It seems to me that attention is a valuable commodity that can be sold in many ways other than advertising--but I guess I'm too stuck in 20th-century thinking to come up with any ideas. How else might Google make money, other than by selling ads? What other ways are there for an Internet business to make money by selling its users' attention? Leave a comment on the InformationWeek Blog and let me know.

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Sony's Plan To Fix Infected Copy Protection Only Makes
Matters Worse

Sony's suggested method for removing the program actually widens the security hole the original software created, researchers say.

ID Theft Numbers May Be Misleading
The problem of identity theft can be too broadly defined and is often misunderstood, leading to potential inflation of the numbers of people involved and the misdirection of public policy debates.

Newest Sober Attack Predicted By Police
Three more bilingual Sober worms are on the loose, according to alerts from various antivirus firms.

IM Worms Mutating At An Alarming Rate
Instant-messaging threats are mutating at an alarming rate, as virus writers attempt to bypass security-system updates that companies use for protection, security vendor IMlogic says. It said it has found that 88% of all worms tracked by its threat center also have mutations.

Keyloggers Jump 65% As Info Theft Goes Mainstream
The number of keyloggers unleashed by hackers soared by 65% this year as E-criminals rush to steal identities and information, according to VeriSign iDefense.

Internet Security Market To Reach $58 Billion By 2010
The global Internet security market is expected to grow at an annual rate of 16% over the next five years to reach $58.1 billion by 2010, according to a soon-to-be-published report from Business Communications.

Enterprises Patching Faster Than Ever, But Still Not Fast Enough
Two out of every three machines have critical vulnerabilities, a security researcher says.


3. Breaking News

AOL Launching Online Video Of TV's Favorite Oldies
The cult TV series "Babylon 5," "Welcome Back, Kotter," and "Chico And The Man" are among the titles to be available on streaming video beginning early next year.

Willing To Pay $500 For 'Velvet Glove' Monthly Cell-Phone Service?
Talk To Voce

Voce's celebrity-priced cell service includes unlimited calling and a new phone every four months.

Venture Firm To Acquire Serena Software For $1.2 Billion
Buyout indicates growing need for software-infrastructure-management tools.

Enterprise Content Management
Government and industry regulations are driving companies to comply, requiring many firms to evaluate how they manage and store unstructured content such as E-mail and blogs.

Tucson And Calif. Town To Deploy Wi-Fi Muni Networks
Two more cities have approved the deployment of municipal Wi-Fi networks, adding to the gathering momentum for public-network rollouts of the wireless technology.

Virginia Taps Northrop Grumman For $2 Billion IT Overhaul
The state of Virginia is outsourcing IT work to Northrop Grumman in what's believed to be the largest such deal by a state government. It will move more than 900 jobs to Northrop.

Cisco Launches Enterprise Management, Mesh Products
New routers and switches are aimed at providing greater centralized control over enterprise wireless LANs.

CA Adds Service Availability And Management Platforms
The two platforms integrate pieces of CA's newly released Unicenter r11 software components as well as other existing products.

EBay Makes Access To Its Web Services Free
EBay is looking to attract new developers and reward third parties who built applications for its auction and E-commerce services.

U.N. Program Connects On Oracle Worldwide
Some 9,000 employees of the U.N. Development Programme will access Oracle PeopleSoft ERP applications via a Web browser from 145 countries.

All our latest news
http://www.informationweek.com/news

Watch More News
http://www.thenewsshow.tv

John Soat With 'IT Orbit' In The Current Episode Of 'The News Show'
CA unveils lots of new products, IBM leads the supercomputer race, and consumers take action against companies responsible for lost data.

Also in Tuesday's episode:

Chris Murphy With 'Databases For Free'
Oracle president Charles Phillips discusses the logic behind Oracle's free databases and the future of the business.

Tim Moran Is The 'Web Answer Man'
Tips on finding jobs on the Web. IT, banking, and finance all appear to be hot markets, according to industry experts.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

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Security Benchmark
We invite you to benchmark your approach against 2,540 of your U.S. peers with this fast, informative, and confidential security tool from InformationWeek and Accenture, a management-consulting and technology-services company.
http://www.informationweek.com/benchmark/security2005.jhtml

-----------------------------------------


4. In Depth

Gates Outlines Microsoft's High-Performance Computing Plans
Second beta version of Windows Compute Cluster Server 2003 disclosed at supercomputing conference.

Microsoft Readies Dynamics GP 9.0 ERP Platform
Microsoft on Tuesday said it is ready to release a Web services-based ERP platform in keeping with its broader strategy toward software that runs an array of business tasks on the Internet.

Microsoft Launches Free Enterprise Desktop-Search Tool
The software comes after years of complaints over how hard it can be to locate Microsoft Word documents, sort through long E-mail lists, and find other types of data.


5. Voice Of Authority

Virginia Governor Opts For Onshore Outsourcing
Paul McDougall says: The state of Virginia seems to have found a unique way to procure IT services economically without sending the bulk of the work offshore. Under a deal that's worth up to $2 billion over the next 10 years, Virginia has hired Northrop Grumman to provide mainframe, server, desktop maintenance, and application development services. But there's a catch. To fulfill the contract, Northrop Grumman has to spend more than $55 million of its own money to build new data centers in Virginia to house the operations. Northrop Grumman will also fund IT education programs at the University of Virginia as part of the deal.


6. White Papers

Secure Application Development
Information must be both secure and available in order to retain its value. This paper discusses the current state of application security and explains why security should be integrated into every stage of application development.


7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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