News
Commentary
3/30/2008
10:48 AM
Howard Marks
Howard Marks
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

GoVault - It's The Software, Stupid

Simplicity is the key to products for the SOHO market. Small business owners are like one-armed paperhangers; accounting, technology, and other administration tasks will always take second place to doing enough business to make next week's payroll. The backup software bundled with Quantum's GoVault uses this year's hot technology, data deduplication, to make backup to GoVault's removable hard drive cartridges simple as any I've seen. All you have to do is pick the folders to backup and set a sch

Simplicity is the key to products for the SOHO market. Small business owners are like one-armed paperhangers; accounting, technology, and other administration tasks will always take second place to doing enough business to make next week's payroll. The backup software bundled with Quantum's GoVault uses this year's hot technology, data deduplication, to make backup to GoVault's removable hard drive cartridges simple as any I've seen. All you have to do is pick the folders to backup and set a schedule. The rest of the thinking is done for you.A few years ago vendors ,including Quantum (GoVault), Imation (Odyssey and Ulysses), and ProStor (RDX) all released removable hard drive systems targeting the backup market. They all packaged 2.5-inch hard drives in shock-mounted cartridges that clearly had a lot more engineering behind them than the plastic hard drive sleds I buy from NewEgg for $20 so I can change lab systems personalities in a flash.

Some flopped, like Imation's Ulysses, which was intended to replace tapes and tape drives in tape libraries, bringing a whole new meaning to Virtual Tape Library. Others have seen it hard to find a market that's willing to pay a premium for a nice sturdy cartridge when USB hard drives are a dime a dozen.

Quantum's solution is to deliver cool, easy-to-use software. The first time a backup job is run against a new cartridge, it does a full backup. Since the software does subfile data deduplication, subsequent backups always are going to backup just the data that's changed since the last backup, relieving the poor SOHO user from having to choose between full, incremental, and differential backups.

For $750, a SOHO user could get started with the dock (Internal IDE or USB) and 2 160-GB cartridges so it could start a simple on-site/off-site rotation. At $300 a throw, GoVault cartridges cost almost three times the cost of USB hard drives, but with deduplication will hold a lot more.

It's not the right solution for backing up your media collection, but looks like a good solution for the SOHO user that needs a brainless backup of its accounting and CRM data.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 27, 2014
Who wins in cloud price wars? Short answer: not IT. Enterprises don't want bare-bones IaaS. Providers must focus on support, not undercutting rivals.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Howard Marks talks about steps to take in choosing the right cloud storage solutions for your IT problems
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.