Healthcare // Analytics
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3/30/2011
05:25 PM
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IT And Marketing: How Digital Media's Changing The Relationship

The pressure is on to show measurable results from campaigns. That should make IT and marketing teams closer partners than they are.

Better Targeting

Kodak's customer segmentation is much more fine-grained than it used to be. The manufacturer formerly built campaigns around customer personas that were "more aspirational than real," Brosch says, citing the proverbial 25- to 34-year-old suburban soccer mom with two kids.

Kodak now leans more on its database, which has information on some 50 million consumers, aggregated from product registrations, customer-service interactions, direct purchases on the Kodak retail website, purchases and registrations on its photo-sharing site, and interactions through social networks. Kodak appends psychographic and demographic information to this data from third-party databases, a common practice for marketers.

All this data has allowed Kodak to replace those crude personas with in-depth profiles of customer groups and buying patterns. For example, buyers of the entry-level C310 multifunction printer have a very different profile from those who buy the more expensive ESP Office 6150. "We skew everything, including the retail packaging, the product descriptions, and the ad creative content for every channel, to what we know about those consumers," Brosch says.

Digital Marketing
CMOs Aren't Ready
38% say company is prepared to exploit digital marketing
59% blame insufficient funding for not being ready
46% blame lack of senior management understanding
46% blame IT for insufficient support
Data: CMO Council/Accenture survey of CMOs and CIOs

Fine-grained segmentation is made possible by analytics, and it drives more cost-effective purchasing of lists and media placements. Instead of advertising the entire ink-jet printer line in a broad publication, for example, Kodak will target probable 6150 buyers though a lower-cost combination of print ads in niche magazines, Web banner ads on selected sites, and email lists known to reach small-office or home-office buyers.

The basic outline is old hat, but Kodak and other marketers have had to expand and improve their data aggregation and management capabilities to unite formerly separate silos of customer information. They've also had to refine their customer segmentation and then test across more channels.

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