Healthcare // Mobile & Wireless
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7/31/2014
02:10 PM
Alison Diana
Alison Diana
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10 Health Apps That Might Make You Sick

As government and industry groups debate the best way to oversee healthcare apps, some questionable software hits the market.
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Pain relief 
Suffer from migraines, fibromyalgia, or chronic pain? Several developers claim their apps help allay these conditions, much to the concern of some medical professionals. 'Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled,' according to researchers at the Centre for Pain Research, University of Bath, England.
Today, consumers can choose apps like Pain Killer 2.0, which claims: 'If you have chronic pain or ANY pain -- you need this. Put your headphones on and tap Start. Your pain melts away in minutes. It's that easy.' Or they could select Pain Relief 2.0, PainKill Free WellWave, which has 'beneficial sounds for pain relieving,' or Headache Rife, which uses color and sound to target headache pain.

(Source: PainKiller 2.0)

Pain relief

Suffer from migraines, fibromyalgia, or chronic pain? Several developers claim their apps help allay these conditions, much to the concern of some medical professionals. "Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled," according to researchers at the Centre for Pain Research, University of Bath, England.

Today, consumers can choose apps like Pain Killer 2.0, which claims: "If you have chronic pain or ANY pain -- you need this. Put your headphones on and tap Start. Your pain melts away in minutes. It's that easy." Or they could select Pain Relief 2.0, PainKill Free WellWave, which has "beneficial sounds for pain relieving," or Headache Rife, which uses color and sound to target headache pain.

(Source: PainKiller 2.0)

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David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 2:50:47 PM
Re: Patient, beware
I also wonder how different some of these are, really, from someone who writes a book about their miracle diet, the results of which may be scientifically debatable. No way the FDA could review all of those to make sure they work. Ditto for all the books about how to get pregnant (parallel to the app in that category) or raise healthy kids, which are all getting electronic equivalents.

An app that tells you your mole is just a mole, when really it's cancer - yes, I'd agree that's in a different category and worthy of regulatory oversight.
Laurianne
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50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 2:28:59 PM
Patient, beware
Think about where that healthcare app comes from before you buy it. Some apps may be no better than Internet myths -- and may even use Internet myths to their advantage.
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
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