Healthcare // Mobile & Wireless
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11/29/2013
09:01 AM
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Google Glass Enables Surgeons To Consult Remotely

When surgeon Brent Ponce wore Google Glass during a shoulder replacement, the ghostly hand of a remote collaborator coached him along.

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David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 11:19:57 AM
Re: Liability
The software vendor mentioned here actually does more business in field service repair sorts of scenarios than in healthcare, even though one of the company cofounders was a surgeon and originally envisioned the tech for healthcare applications.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/3/2013 | 9:20:11 AM
Re: Liability
Using Google Glass in surgery takes it into one of the more difficult environments, but consider it for less demanding environments like doing machine repairs, where a technician who's stumped can call in to an expert and get this same kind of guidance for fixing a refrigerator or washing machine. Lots of business use potential in it.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 5:00:42 PM
Re: Neutral Tech
>Doesn't anyone else think people wearing Glass in public looks downright awkward?

It is awkward. But some compelling apps are emerging, like the recently introduced translation capability. I suspect Glass will thrive in niche markets for a while until people get used to it. But Google does have to do some work to assure people they're not being filmed all the time.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
12/2/2013 | 10:38:43 AM
Re: Liability
I did ask about the risk of this being a distraction. Dr. Ponce said no, because he actually had to glance up and to the right to see the projected virtual image. There were plenty of times during the procedure when he was busy and so ignored it.

Remember that using cameras and monitors in the operating room to provide magnification or a better view of the area where the surgeon is working is not a new thing -- there are some procedures where this is essential. So being able to glance at a video image to get additional info, beyond what can be seen with the naked eye, is something many surgeons already have practice doing.
LeeB120
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LeeB120,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2013 | 1:35:28 AM
Re: Medical applications
I agree. It's going to be certain applications that really make or break these things.  That capability would be useful not only to medical doctors but also to mechanical and electrical technicians too.  It would also be very useful in certain educational settings.

 These glasses might not ever really make it in the social market but they will get real popular in many industries with the right software.

 
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2013 | 11:21:29 PM
Liability
"It's not unreasonable to say that this will be the standard of care in the near future,"

Cynically, I have to wonder whether the lawyers will put paid to this. If there's a problem with video-assisted surgery and somebody litigates, I wonder who would be responsible? If one party blames the quality of the image, or the alignment of the superposition of the hand (for example), is the software manufacturer now on the hook too? 

I did wonder how the change of attention between the glasses and the patient might negatively impact performance. Still, conceptually the idea of being able to provide this kind of remote expertise is certainly attractive, and I hope that one way or another it becomes available more widely.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2013 | 11:05:40 PM
Re: Lending a hand
With these sorts of rapid technological advances, we are this close -- this close -- to having the holodeck from Star Trek: TNG!  :D
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2013 | 10:42:55 PM
Re: Neutral Tech
I've said some pretty critical things about Google Glass in the past, primarily because I think the idea of people walking aroung in public with them on seems rude.

But I do believe that wearable technology could have a huge impact on the workplace, where augementing reality makes a lot more economic sense. 

Doesn't anyone else think people wearing Glass in public looks downright awkward?
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
11/30/2013 | 10:14:36 PM
Re: Medical applications
@Paul – yes google has changed the way we were looking at Google glasses, all these days we know it just as another virtual glass that has few functions. 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
11/30/2013 | 10:13:01 PM
Re: Lending a hand
@Joe – The tactical feedback idea is great, I'm sure Google is working on it to have the same built to Google glasses.
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