Healthcare // Mobile & Wireless
News
7/28/2014
09:33 AM
Rodney Brown
Rodney Brown
Slideshows
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Wearable Tech: 5 Healthcare Wins

While most businesses still view wearable computers as little more than toys, healthcare has embraced them. Check out these interesting examples.
Previous
1 of 6
Next

Wearable computing technology is nothing new in the movies; think James Bond watches or -- okay, this is a stretch -- the wired colander brain scanner Rick Moranis wore in Ghostbusters. But in the real world, wearable tech has not made much of a dent yet with consumers or business. The exception is the healthcare industry, where wearable devices, particularly Google Glass, seem to have found their first enthusiastic home.

Today's wearable tech movement got its start with Nike+ technology, which began as sensors in running shoes designed to track performance. That was in 2006, when Nike and Apple teamed up on the first killer collaboration for a wearable technology, the Nike+iPod Sport Kit.

So it should come as no surprise that fitness is where the wearables sector did most of its early growing, with occasional forays into vests and jackets that contained torn-down laptops connected to heads up display goggles -- and the truly unfortunate keyboard pants.

Then Google came out of left field with Google Glass, slightly cumbersome-looking eyewear that functions as a wearable computer when paired with a smartphone that has a reliable cellular connection to the Internet.

While late-night talk-show hosts made comic hay with nerd jokes, Google couldn't keep the developer-and-press-only Glass in stock, even at $1,500 a pop for a very early beta product. That's because developers and entrepreneurs appreciated the potential of having an augmented reality display available while you were doing your job -- be it as a field technician accessing an online repair manual or a doctor calling up a patient's record during an exam. Explore our slideshow to see five innovative ways healthcare is using Google Glass and other wearable tech.

Image credit: gbfans.com

Rodney Brown is a veteran of both the newspaper world and the retail management world. Having held nearly every job a newspaper has, from selling advertising to running the presses, he truly has been an ink-stained wretch. Now, with the web, he is pixel-stained. He cut his ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 6
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 7:42:15 AM
Re: " Wearable Intelligence"
I think the biggest problem with this solution is the patient remembering to put the glasses on.  It would be easier to make wearing them part of your daily routine than say remembering what time you took your last dose of an antibiotic but it will be interesting to see how this all works out.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 5:06:38 PM
Re: Diabetics
@Whoopty, My thoughts are aligned to your thoughts. I am totally stoked about how such breakthroughs can impact people in the medical realm. We are entering into a new era and the possibilities are endless!
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 5:03:51 PM
Re: Therapy
@Alison, Thanks for sharing. I really like the idea of having a visual record to monitor progress and to gather data in terms of exploring a possible link between adhering to a physical therapy regimen and progress in condition/diagnosis.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:57:46 PM
Re: Diabetics
@Alison_Diana, it really is encouraging to see all of the programs targeting individuals with diabetes. I really appreciate how much awareness has been raised in terms of preventing and treating diabetes. We must continue to spread the word and share the resources.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:55:20 PM
Re: great innovations
@Laurianne, Yes, I like the idea too. Warning drowsy drivers is a good thing. Many lives could be spared.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:52:50 PM
Re: great innovations
@PedroGonzales, I look forward to hearing about technology advances for individuals that are visually impaired. That would be wonderful! I am all for advances in technology to support those with any kind of impairments or disabilities.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:47:29 PM
Re: Apps for wearables
@Susan, I think this is very advantageous for diabetics to use. I know several people with Diabetes and can't wait to share this information with others!
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:38:43 PM
Re: " Wearable Intelligence"
@SaneIt, I agree. I think it is a great idea, especially for forgetful patients or patients that are lacking their faculties for many varying reasons.
freespiritny25
50%
50%
freespiritny25,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 4:36:31 PM
Re: Is Google really at the center of the healthcare wearables action?
@David Carr, That is good for the consumers. They will be able to shop around and will be able to compare prices.
David F. Carr
50%
50%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 10:16:29 AM
Is Google really at the center of the healthcare wearables action?
I know there is a lot of excitement about Google Glass and apps that go with it, but there are a lot of other companies innovating in this area as well.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 24, 2014
Start improving branch office support by tapping public and private cloud resources to boost performance, increase worker productivity, and cut costs.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.