Healthcare // Patient Tools
News
7/12/2012
02:34 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Healthcare Social Media: Time To Get On Board

Many hospitals and practices still hesitate to jump on board the social media bandwagon. Here's some practical advice to guide your organization through the decision process.
Previous
10 of 10
Next


If you want to be part of QuantiaMD, you better know what you're getting yourself into. Yes, it's a social network of physicians, but according to Eric Schultz, chairman and CEO, it's social in the sense that you interact with other physicians, but in a professional manner within a gated community--in other words, true peer-to-peer.

According to Schultz, only clinicians who pass a rigorous validation can participate. "People interact using their real names, it's a professional network and because they use their real name the behavior is very professional and the interaction is professionally focused," Schultz told InformationWeek Healthcare. QuantiaMD is free to participating doctors.

QuantiaMD offers interactive content and has a faculty of more than 540 experts who create interactive cases and short concise presentations where physicians can talk about the merits of a diagnosis or the availability of treatment methodologies.

Recommended Reading

Healthcare Social Media: New Software Aims To Limit Risks

Healthcare Patient Data Laws Outdated: Consumers Union?

HHS Grants Tap Health IT To Improve Quality

Doctors' Tablet Use Almost Doubles In 2012

Telemedicine Tackles Mental Health Treatment

Previous
10 of 10
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Tim Pacileo
50%
50%
Tim Pacileo,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/18/2012 | 5:13:53 PM
re: Healthcare Social Media: Time To Get On Board
Social Media is a real game changer for most healthcare marketers, but not in the sense that many of us think of when it comes to social media benefits. Social Media actually impacts the cultural and lifestyle of the hospital marketer which in turn drives this reluctance to change.

Once a hospital goes live with social media it's no longer about pushing out messaging and developing campaigns in a 9-5 setting. When a hospital goes "live" with social media they can't turn it off, it runs 7 X 24 X 365 in real time. Someone needs to monitor the sites and be able to respond to inquires as the expectations from the users are to have quick responses to their messages. If there are negative comments on the social sites many of the hospitals have not even thought about how to respond. In fact I heard comments such that "If we don't go social then we don't have to worry about it". Clearly this is a flawed approach as we know people will post their comments on other sites and in most cases the hospital will not be aware of the comments, until the press or some other entity brings it to their attention. It's much better to have the sites up and listen then it is to get blindsided.

As for the security and HIPAA concerns, again I am not seeing many hospitals with social media policies in place and they need to have them even if they have not set up their corporate sites. Any hospital employee, nurse and/or physician that is active on a social media site should be following the guidelines and policies of the hospital, but if these don't exist they actually put the hospital at risk and in some cases the employee, nurse or physician are at risk as well both personally and professionally. In one quick example a nurse who was very active on her social media site had a patient who would not ask her for a data in person, found out on her Facebook page that she was single and asked her out on Facebook. Having the proper policies in place could have prevented this from occurring.

Nest we have an accountability concern because everything in the digital world can be managed, monitored and modified for ROI. It's not like in the good old days when one sent out thousands of postcards and hoped for a 2% response rate, or they ran an ad and if it didn't get the results they ran the same ad again. In the online world you can run an ad for a few days and if it's not working, you can change it on the fly to improve the results or re-target it to a different audience. There is much more flexibility tied to these solutions to drive better results and more impact for the brand and there also is more work because of it.

Today the online world of marketing is disrupting how many of the hospital leadership teams and supporting marketing teams promote their brand or services/specialties and they are not thoroughly convinced that online marketing will drive the benefits they seek, despite all the information and statistics to support this transition. There is also the concern of even more transparency and accountability and a new set of tools and solutions not just in social media but in digital marketing, mobile marketing and Big Data that all impact hospital marketing.

Social media and online marketing are gaining momentum and growing in importance to the healthcare marketer. It's not too late to get on the train and embrace the change, but you need to be able to move quickly as this change is accelerating.

Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.