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High-Tech Obsolescence: How To Date Yourself In A Nanosecond

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: High-Tech Obsolescence: How To Date Yourself In A Nanosecond
2. Today's Top Story
    - Update: Feds Seek Google Search Records In Porn Investigation
    - Yahoo Gave Search Data To Bush Administration Lawyers
    - Apple Addresses ITunes Privacy Concerns
    - New Laplink Suite Blocks Attacks
3. Breaking News
    - U.S. Fills Its Latest Quota Of H-1B Visas For Foreign Workers
    - CIO Confidence Levels Mixed: Report
    - Security Company Uses Google To Help Find Vulnerabilities
    - Oracle: 'We're Halfway To Fusion'
    - New Worm Hits The Top Of The Threat Charts
    - Google Opens IM, VoIP Services
    - Open-Source License Debate Kicks Off
    - Tokyo Market Scrambles To Recover From Livedoor Charges
    - Update: Competing UWB Groups Vow To Press On
    - RFID, Other Tech In Spotlight At Retail Show
    - Rocket Scientist Seeks Job Via eBay
    - F-Secure Quickly Fixes 23 Flaws In Its Antivirus Products
    - Office Live To Feature Web Mail Client
4. Grab Bag
    - Less Waiting, Fingerprint Check Coming To Your Bank
    - Calling-Records Sales Face New Scrutiny
    - 'E-Waste' Law Forces Manufacturers To Pick Up Tab
5. In Depth: Personal Tech & Reviews
    - How-To: Setting Up Wireless Presentation Systems
    - Spyware Prevention Strategies, Part 2: Offense And Defense
    - Geek Chic: Pro Tech's NoiseBuster Headphones Shut Out the World Around You
    - Size Matters: The Smart Phone Conundrum
    - Review: Cisco Aironet 1500 Is Easy To Deploy And Built To Last
    - Review: Microsoft Small Business Accounting 2006
6. Voice Of Authority: IT Confidential: Sex Sells, But Not Like It Used To
7. White Papers: Fighting The Hidden Dangers Of Internet Access
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"The ability to delude yourself may be an important survival tool." -- Jane Wagner


1. Editor's Note: High-Tech Obsolescence: How To Date Yourself In A Nanosecond

I'm a night owl, or, as one of my smarty-pants sisters likes to put it, a vampire. I don't require lots of sleep, and I can get so much done in the distraction-free hours of the night. That's also when I happen to listen to TV the most--usually in background for a little white noise. Every now and then, something flashing across the screen from one of the mostly boring late-night talk shows catches my attention. The other night it was the Jimmy Kimmel Live! show. He did a very amusing sketch with another guy titled something like, "Words We Didn't Know 10 Years Ago." Basically, they sat down and talked about iPods and IMing each other. It was cute.

And it got me to thinking--what do I take for granted that my nieces and nephews, ages 2 to 7, and even some older kids today won't know or will barely recognize when they hear it? Once I started pulling together a list, it was hard to stop. So here's how to date yourself in a nanosecond:

  • Albums, records, cassette tapes, and turntables (though the trendonistas say the turntable is making a comeback).

  • Typewriters. Self-explanatory, but I can remember clamoring to use a Tele-Ram portabubble and later an Atex portable. The former was torturous to use, the latter barely luggable, but both were still way better than a typewriter. A colleague recalls student journalists in the early '90s asking her how you turned on a (manual) typewriter. 'Nuff said.

  • Video-rental stores (hard to believe they still exist, actually).

  • Tethered phones (landlines) and eventually, I expect, wired anything.

  • Paper letters or notes or records. We E-mail, text message, IM, teleconference, and voice mail. Our kids won't need no stinking stamps and nice paper, never mind notepads.

    Once you get going, it's not hard to come up with a list. I even thought of "things that could go away, but for the innate need to socialize," and "concepts and things so culturally sacred, they are not likely to ever disappear--though they might evolve." If you want to feel very old, you can read the rest of my selections by going here. I'd be curious to know what's missing from this list, and what you think will be on it before long.

    Patricia Keefe
    pkeefe@cmp.com
    www.informationweek.com


    2. Today's Top Story

    Update: Feds Seek Google Search Records In Porn Investigation
    The Justice Department is seeking the data to bolster its claims that the Child Online Protection Act, intended to protect children from online obscenity, does not violate the Constitution. Yahoo cooperated with a similar request.

    Related Stories:

    Yahoo Gave Search Data To Bush Administration Lawyers
    Yahoo Inc. on Thursday acknowledged handing over search data requested in a subpoena from the Bush administration, which is hoping to use the information to revive an anti-porn law that was rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court.

    Apple Addresses ITunes Privacy Concerns
    Apple added a warning that tells people that information about the songs they select in their iTunes MiniStore library is transmitted over the Internet.

    New Laplink Suite Blocks Attacks
    PCdefense fills the holes in other security software by concentrating on identity-theft protection and privacy safeguards.


    3. Breaking News

    U.S. Fills Its Latest Quota Of H-1B Visas For Foreign Workers
    The United States has filled 20,000 slots for foreign workers with advanced degrees from U.S. universities.

    CIO Confidence Levels Mixed: Report
    IT execs are upbeat about current conditions but are less sure about the immediate future, a new Forrester survey says, and they expect 2006 tech spending to fall short of last year's.

    Security Company Uses Google To Help Find Vulnerabilities
    Malicious hackers have been doing it for a while. Now, Secure Elements is using Google search technology to help security managers spot vulnerabilities in their networks.

    Oracle: 'We're Halfway To Fusion'
    The company is incorporating elements from PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, and eventually Siebel into its own applications and is trying to do it without being disruptive to customers.

    New Worm Hits The Top Of The Threat Charts
    The worm, which debuted Tuesday, is now No. 3 on F-Secure's updated virus list and accounted for more than 11% of all malicious code the company intercepted in the last 24 hours.

    Google Opens IM, VoIP Services
    Google opened its instant-messaging and Internet telephony services to any company willing to support XMPP. That will help other vendors build apps that interoperate with Google's.

    Open-Source License Debate Kicks Off
    With the draft of version 3 of the General Public License come many questions. Among them, one vendor says, is whether end users using a Web-based application have the right to share and modify software licensed under GPL.

    Tokyo Market Scrambles To Recover From Livedoor Charges
    The scandal over allegations of accounting fraud by Livedoor, an Internet portal operator, caused a run on IT stocks and has claimed at least one life.

    Update: Competing UWB Groups Vow To Press On
    Although the IEEE's ultrawideband standards group is disbanding, the work will live on in other forms, two vendor groups say.

    RFID, Other Tech In Spotlight At Retail Show
    The future includes RFID coupled with cell phones, biometrics, and more sophisticated self-checkouts, one retail executive said at this week's National Retail Federation trade show.

    Rocket Scientist Seeks Job Via eBay
    He's looking for a position working on space applications, unmanned aerial positions, or at a golf manufacturing company. So far, he's gotten no offers but lots of unsolicited advice.

    F-Secure Quickly Fixes 23 Flaws In Its Antivirus Products
    The flaws in its flagship Windows and Linux antivirus line were revealed by an independent researcher.

    Office Live To Feature Web Mail Client
    "Office Live Mail" will include free and paid versions and will allow users to save E-mail messages to a local machine.

    All our latest news

    Watch More News

    In the current episode:

    Eric Chabrow with "Spanning The Cyberglobe"

    Larry Greenemeier with "Hacker Defender"

    Eric Chabrow with "Sofa Spud Prevention"


    4. Grab Bag: High-Tech News From Around The Web

    Less Waiting, Fingerprint Check Coming To Your Bank (Reuters)
    Imagine a personalized welcome, few queues, and fingerprint checks. This could be your bank branch in the future, thanks to cutting-edge technology such as radio-frequency identification and biometric scanning.

    Calling-Records Sales Face New Scrutiny (AP)
    Phone companies and federal lawmakers are demanding it be halted. The Federal Communications Commission is launching an investigation. The business of buying and selling private phone-calling records is suddenly under considerable scrutiny.

    'E-Waste' Law Forces Manufacturers To Pick Up Tab (AP)
    A first-in-the-nation law went into effect Wednesday in Maine, requiring makers of televisions and computer monitors to pick up the tab to recycle and safely dispose of their products once they are discarded.


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    5. In Depth: Personal Tech & Reviews

    How-To: Setting Up Wireless Presentation Systems
    If your offices are full of projectors and wires, it may be time for a clean-up job. We give you the lowdown on how to build a wireless presentation system and a rundown on the tools you'll need.

    Spyware Prevention Strategies, Part 2: Offense And Defense
    Now that your system is clean of spyware, these methods will help you keep it that way.

    Geek Chic: Pro Tech's NoiseBuster Headphones Shut Out the World Around You
    Getting great sound in an airplane at 35,000 feet doesn't require shelling out $300 for a high-end Bose noise-cancellation headset.

    Size Matters: The Smart Phone Conundrum
    As smart phones get smaller, usability and reliability trade-offs become inevitable. Find out whether the trade-offs are worth it.

    Review: Cisco Aironet 1500 Is Easy To Deploy And Built To Last
    There's a lot to like about Cisco's entry in the arena, but some strings are attached.

    Review: Microsoft Small Business Accounting 2006
    Microsoft's entry into the small-business accounting software arena is a serious contender, if still a little rough around the edges.


    6. Voice Of Authority

    IT Confidential: Sex Sells, But Not Like It Used To
    Sex sells. It's an axiom of marketing and business. The fact that sex helps sell technology has been a truism since at least the early days of videotape technology. But, the more he thought about it, the more John Soat decided that if the axiom that "adult entertainment" drives the acceptance of technology was ever true, it's not any more. Sex didn't drive the phenomenal acceptance of the cell phone, interpersonal communication and convenience did. Still, he concedes sex does play a role in the market for new digital media.


    7. White Papers

    Fighting The Hidden Dangers Of Internet Access
    This E-book attempts to present some of the growing threats that exploit your organization's Internet access and to demonstrate how a dedicated appliance solution like iPrism can secure your network and prevent the downtime, loss of productivity, and other problems associated with unmanaged Internet access.


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