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IBM And AMD Unveil Breakthroughs In 45-Nanometer Chip Production

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Ban The Analysts? Maybe Not
2. Today's Top Story
    - IBM And AMD Unveil Breakthroughs In 45-Nanometer Chip Production
    - Tokyo University, Taiwan Firms Craft 512-Core Chip
3. Breaking News
    - Unix Users Prefer IBM And Sun
    - HP CEO: We Have More Cutting To Do
    - Oracle Loses Would-Be Customer To SAP Due To Integration Concerns
    - Microsoft's Office Communications Server Targets Business VoIP Users
    - Salesforce.com To Launch iTunes-Inspired AppStore
    - Google Gives Its Finance Page A Facelift
    - Yahoo Opens New Advertising Platform
    - RIM Sues To Stop Sales Of Samsung's BlackJack Smartphone
    - China To Challenge India As Top Outsourcing Destination
    - Are You Suffering From Mouse Rage Syndrome?
    - Microsoft's Allchin Says His 'I Would Buy A Mac' Statement Was Taken Out Of Context
4. In Depth: Security
    - UCLA Admits Massive Data Hack
    - Microsoft Patches Critical IE, Media Player, Visual Studio Bugs
    - Ransomware Attack Targets Hotmail Accounts
    - Thwarting Sex Offenders From Preying On Social Web Sites
5. Voice Of Authority
    - Power To The People
6. White Papers
    - Securing Data at the Endpoint
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote Of The Day:
"The only people who can change the world are people who want to. And not everybody does." —Hugh Macleod


1. Editor's Note: Ban The Analysts? Maybe Not

It looks like the sometimes-raging debate over whether journalists should quote industry analysts — be they technology or financial specialists — has flared up again, this time in an interesting story in a U.K.-based IT publication. Check it out — the story examines whether to quote the same analysts that U.S. publications talk to. The article notes the New York Times has banned quoting analysts, and then violated its own ban.

There are several schools of thought here, obviously, but there are two basic camps:

• Analysts are paid flunkeys. They are hired by vendor companies (and other corporations and organizations with axes to grind) to survey and research markets and customer references, and to write white papers, etc., that support product types or strategies. So isn't everything they say tainted?

• Good analysts are experts in their field, and they are sought out by vendor companies for the same reason user companies buy their reports and attend their conference sessions — they have expertise worth listening to. Sure, they make most of their money serving the vendor market with survey and research services, but they can't afford to discredit themselves by not being honest about the products and services they are speaking about.

There is no question who is paying the bills at most high-tech analyst firms. But it's so easy to sneer at the objectivity of the people who work there, that it's become knee-jerk. I'm really curious to know what readers think — after all, we're writing to you. Do you want to see analysts quoted, or would you rather rely on the reporter's expertise? If we don't quote analysts, that leaves the vendors (talk about self-serving!), users (if we can find any who are allowed to talk on the record), or some mix of government, legal, or other related, interested parties. But maybe you'd rather skip all that and instead have reporters rely on their own knowledge and observation? We'd really like to know. You can post your opinion, and read more about this issue, by going to the blog entry for this editor's note.


2. Today's Top Story

IBM And AMD Unveil Breakthroughs In 45-Nanometer Chip Production
The companies say they've successfully combined cutting-edge techniques like immersion lithography and ultra-low-k interconnect dielectrics.

Tokyo University, Taiwan Firms Craft 512-Core Chip
The University of Tokyo taps Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing and Alchip Technologies to make a 512-core ASIC that will help in genome sequencing or exploring the universe.


3. Breaking News

Unix Users Prefer IBM And Sun
IBM retained its top spot and Sun improved its standing with Unix users, but Hewlett-Packard slipped in the latest vendor preference ratings.

HP CEO: We Have More Cutting To Do
Hewlett-Packard Chairman and CEO Mark Hurd reinforced his reputation for fanatical attention to efficiency at his meeting Tuesday with financial analysts in New York, where he said HP still has a long way to go to strip all the unnecessary costs from its business.

Oracle Loses Would-Be Customer To SAP Due To Integration Concerns
One of the biggest turnoffs to Oracle, says Sport Chalet CFO Howard Kaminsky, was the lack of integration between Oracle financial applications and the retail apps of Retek, which it acquired about 18 months ago.

Microsoft's Office Communications Server Targets Business VoIP Users
The software company unveiled plans to conduct an ambitious beta test centered on its Office Communications Server with links to its 2007 Microsoft Office applications.

Salesforce.com To Launch iTunes-Inspired AppStore
AppExchange will offer potential buyers the ability to search and try software, and then to buy and deploy it.

Google Gives Its Finance Page A Facelift
Google has added better stock charts and modules that track trends in the market's top moving companies, and it now lets registered users build their own portfolios to track stocks and companies.

Yahoo Opens New Advertising Platform
Since its launch in October, Yahoo's new search marketing platform had been available only to the portal's existing advertisers. Now it's available to any U.S. company willing to open a search-advertising account with Yahoo.

RIM Sues To Stop Sales Of Samsung's BlackJack Smartphone
RIM claims Samsung infringed on its trademark by giving its smartphone — the BlackJack — a name that can be closely associated with RIM's BlackBerry devices.

China To Challenge India As Top Outsourcing Destination
China wants to convince 100 multinationals to outsource to the country and encourage the development of 1,000 large and midsize indigenous outsourcers.

Are You Suffering From Mouse Rage Syndrome?
Web surfers suffering from Mouse Rage Syndrome show signs of stress and anxiety, according to a new study.

Microsoft's Allchin Says His 'I Would Buy A Mac' Statement Was Taken Out Of Context
Allchin says he was being dramatic in order to convince Steve Ballmer and Bill Gates that change was needed.

All Our Latest News

----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

SOA Conundrum
The business advantages for SOA/Web services adoption are clear: standardization, business-process automation, and flexibility. But SOA/Web services deployment is challenging. Learn how more than 200 companies plan to overcome adoption challenges in this InformationWeek research brief.

Managing Privacy Issues
Identity theft is on the rise across the globe. How do your security strategies for protecting customer data stack up? Learn how your peers are protecting customer data and managing privacy issues in the InformationWeek/Accenture Global Information Security survey of more than 2,000 technology and security professionals.

Tool: Security Plans
We invite you to benchmark your security strategies and tactics against those of your global peers with this fast, informative, and confidential security tool from InformationWeek and Accenture, a management consulting and technology services company.

-----------------------------------------


4. In Depth: Security

UCLA Admits Massive Data Hack
UCLA is alerting approximately 800,000 people that a hacker broke into a university database as long ago as October 2005, but the intrusion wasn't detected until Nov. 21, 2006.

Microsoft Patches Critical IE, Media Player, Visual Studio Bugs
Added to the 71 updates already posted, December's group of seven raises the 2006 total to 78, six more than the previous record set in 2002.

Ransomware Attack Targets Hotmail Accounts
Some Hotmail accounts have been compromised, with all mail and contacts erased. The only remaining message: a ransom note demanding payment for the return of the deleted data.

Thwarting Sex Offenders From Preying On Social Web Sites
MySpace endorses Virginia plan to block sex offenders from social networking sites.


5. Voice Of Authority

Power To The People
It's all about what the kids want. They want YouTube, they want Skype, they want to play Halo over the Internet. And when they grow up and start working in your company, they'll want the same things — well, maybe not the Halo part. As we've written about before, end users more and more are influencing IT department decisions. They clearly want certain applications and support for certain devices, but what do they want in their networks?


6. White Papers

Securing Data At The Endpoint: Four Steps To Protect Your Enterprise From Data Leakage
IT security has become one of the primary challenges facing organizations. Managers must increasingly consider data throughout its life cycle. Safeguarding an organization's most valuable assets — its data — starts at the endpoint, and enterprises must be sure to consider four steps when securing their data.


7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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