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12/21/2005
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Indian Firm Claims Its Antivirus Software Stops Threats

Sanra Software says it has breakthrough antivirus technology based on the intention of malicious codes, which protects PCs from not only known viruses but also from unknown malicious codes and hackers.

BANGALORE, India — Sanra Software Ltd., a Chennai-based firm, has unveiled what it claims is a breakthrough anti-virus technology based on the intention of malicious codes, protecting PCs from not only known viruses but also from unknown malicious codes including viruses, Trojan horses, worms, spyware, keyloggers and hackers.

"Our path-breaking technology takes a snapshot of PCs in complete detail in its malware-free state and continuously monitors system and file change," said N.S. Baskar, managing director of Sanra Software.

New files, configuration changes, alterations in system control files and changes in critical application program files are all evaluated for potential threats. Any change in the system state that represents a potential threat is immediately acted upon.

Sanra’s software contains algorithms that scan the hard disk every 3 minutes and can be programmed to scan as often as every minute. It not only removes the potential threat but also restores the system to its original malware-free state.

The company believes its anti-virus technology is more effective than existing anti-virus technologies, which use either signature-based or heuristic-based methods.

Signature-based anti-virus technology identifies the binary string unique to each virus and updates its database. It also requires constant updating.

Heuristic-based technology identifies viruses based on the suspicious behavior. It does not differentiate between legitimate and suspicious acts and raises false alarms, Baskar said.

Sanra is slated to release the program during the second week of January.

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