Cloud // Cloud Storage
News
3/23/2010
11:14 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Intel, AMD Servers To Run NYSE Data Centers

Like Google, Yahoo, Amazon, and Microsoft, the NYSE is building its data centers with PC-style servers, disk drives, and I/O devices -- on a massive scale.

NYSE Euronext is in the process of equipping two new data centers in the greater New York and London areas and will use them to reposition itself as a technology leader of trading services.

But ultra-modern no longer means ultra-big servers or ultra-complex infrastructure. On the contrary, Google, Yahoo, Amazon, and Microsoft, companies with massive data center capacity, are building data centers with common components -- PC-style servers, disk drives, and I/O devices -- on a massive scale.

At the NYSE facilities, a small portion of each data center is devoted to systems running Sun UltraSparc or IBM Power-based servers, perhaps 80 servers in all, says Steve Rubinow, CIO of NYSE Euronext. But most are Intel and AMD-based servers.

"We have a collection of blades on racks and individual servers -- a mix -- with a lot of storage and networking gear. They are almost exclusively x86 (instruction set) servers," he said in numbers that approach but fall short of 10,000. The servers are four CPU units running dual cores, or eight cores per server, a low-cost sweet spot in the server market.

Amazon and Google are reported to have built 40,000- to 50,000-server data centers; Microsoft boasts the Chicago data center it opened last fall will eventually have 300,000 servers and is believed to be the largest in the world.

The NYSE x86 servers are virtualized "but not heavily," meaning the number of virtual servers per physical machine has been kept light, rather than trying to utilize every CPU cycle with a high number of virtual machines. In some settings, 16-30 VMs per server is considered a heavy load.

Any system that is highly latency sensitive is placed on a lightly virtualized server or non-virtualized server, while the more latency tolerant systems can be doubled up in multiple virtual machines per server.

NYSE customers don't get to choose the level of latency they want. On the contrary, "everyone goes through the same pathway," said Rubinow, so trading services are delivered on a level playing field for all customers. But NYSE wants its trading services to be the lowest latency systems in the world, he said.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Google in the Enterprise Survey
Google in the Enterprise Survey
There's no doubt Google has made headway into businesses: Just 28 percent discourage or ban use of its productivity ­products, and 69 percent cite Google Apps' good or excellent ­mobility. But progress could still stall: 59 percent of nonusers ­distrust the security of Google's cloud. Its data privacy is an open question, and 37 percent worry about integration.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.