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11/15/2006
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Intel Launches Quad-Core Processors

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Beating Back 'BlackBerry Thumb'
2. Today's Top Story
    - Intel Launches Quad-Core Processors
Related Stories
    - AMD Shakes Up Top500 Supercomputer List
    - New Opteron-Based Supercomputer Designed To Break Petaflop
    - AMD Turns Graphics Chip Into High-Performance 'Stream' Processor
3. Breaking News
    - Microsoft Patches Critical XML Flaw, 12 Other Bugs
    - Microsoft Unleashes Forefront Security Suite
    - Microsoft Forms Interoperability Alliance With Other Tech Vendors
    - IBM Unveils $100 Million Innovation Agenda
    - CSC Wins $180 Million Outsourcing Deal
    - Need An Occasional Boost In Bandwidth? AT&T Has It
    - Livermore Labs Turns To Linux-Based Supercomputing Clusters
    - Former HP Chair Patricia Dunn To Be Arraigned Today
    - Court Shutters Spyware Outfit, Freezes Assets
    - Microsoft May Deploy Wireless Patch
    - Zune Sales No Sellout
    - Aperture's Vista 500 Aims To Give IT Managers More Control Over Data Centers
    - Java Look-Alike Project Pushed Sun To Make Java Open Source
4. Grab Bag
    - The Business Side Of Web 2.0 (Wirednews.com)
    - Building A Better Computer (BusinessWeek)
    - Slideshow: Next Year's Coolest Gadgets (Fortune.com)
    - Tech's Got Pals On Capitol Hill (Business 2.0)
5. In Depth: China
    - Where Research, Startups, And Endless Opportunities Are Changing The IT World
    - Special Report: Live From China
    - CIOs In China
    - Photo Essay Image Gallery
    - Video: Chinese To Overtake English As Top Internet Language
    - Blog: Report From China—Chairman Hu And Chairman Gates
    - IBM To Help Educate China's Outsourcing Pros
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Web 3.0 Bombs Among Bloggers
7. White Papers
    - Three Steps To Getting A Grip On Development Costs
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote Of The Day:
"If you put tomfoolery into a computer, nothing comes out of it but tomfoolery. But this tomfoolery, having passed through a very expensive machine, is somehow ennobled and no one dares criticize it." - Pierre Gallois


1. Editor's Note: Beating Back 'BlackBerry Thumb'

Uh-oh, time to call the lawyers? Come to think of it, better make that HR, too! One of the latest cautions making the rounds has "Crackberry" addicts suing their employers down the road over repetitive strain injuries attributed to overuse of the popular handheld e-mail device and similar devices.

Of course, users of computer keyboards—including many users of the Atex publishing system—have spent years unsuccessfully trying to sue over carpal tunnel injuries incurred from nonergonomic setups and typing on uphill keyboards. (So employers have that going for them.)

But carpal tunnel is quite real, and it's pretty painful. I know. So while you might be safe from lawsuits, you still might want to take some steps to keep those worker bees healthy enough to keep working, which in our industry more often than not, means typing away on some device.

According to some reports, the repetitive motion involved in using BlackBerrys, which requires typing with your thumbs, and other handhelds with tiny or awkward keyboards is particularly bad. The overreliance on your thumbs to type is trouble enough, but the fact that mobile handheld devices by definition are not being used in a normal office setting—on a flat, appropriate-height desk—contributes greatly to this budding problem.

Not that this will give most users pause. Many people are as addicted to their handhelds as they are to their cell phones—they want their e-mail and their data, and they want it now, wherever that might find them. Which means few will be parted from the very devices that are giving them a pain in the hand, wrist, and elbows.

Not to panic, though. Just as the industry developed ergonomic standards for desktop computing in response to repetitive strain injuries, so, too, are guidelines emerging for the all-thumbs crowd.

For example, you might want to check out the American Physical Therapy Association, which has released a series of hand exercises that can reduce the chances of developing "BlackBerry thumb."

Or, you could just counsel users to give the ole' BlackBerry a rest every now and then.

Kidding! I know that's not going to happen. After all, I have already undergone (fairly successful) carpal tunnel surgery on one hand, and even knowing I'm going have to do the other hand as well, you'll still have to pry the keyboard from my cold, numb, tingling fingers before I'd switch to (shudder) manual writing or the annoying choices in voice-activated systems out there. I love word processing!

So I know what you're up against. But an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Ah, if only I'd had the ergonomic setups way back when that I have now...

So silly as it may sound, don't slough this one off. IT should be teaming up with HR and spreading the word on preventive care. And as for all you thumb pounders and handheld users, take it seriously. Type away, but take steps to give yourself a break, because if you don't, you're going to find yourself frustrated by nights of pain and hands that just won't do what they used to do.

Are you a BlackBerry, Treo, or Sidekick devotee? Can you feel the effects on your hands and arms, and are you taking any steps to mitigate the impact of your usage of these devices? Do you think companies should be sued over injuries incurred from using these devices? Let me know, by commenting on my blog entry.

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Intel Launches Quad-Core Processors
Performance-hungry users have been anticipating the quad-core processors, which are designed to offer a 50% performance boost over Intel's dual-core chips.

Related Stories

AMD Shakes Up Top500 Supercomputers List
AMD made huge gains in the biannual list, while Intel slipped. But there was no surprise when IBM's BlueGene supercomputer held onto the No. 1 position.

New Opteron-Based Supercomputer Designed To Break Petaflop
The Cray XT4 supercomputer uses as many as 30,000 AMD dual-core Opteron processors and is designed to be upgraded to AMD's quad-core processors when they become available.

AMD Turns Graphics Chip Into High-Performance 'Stream' Processor
AMD adapted an ATI graphics processor for floating-point-intensive computing. The stream processor will have 48 floating-point cores and offer a peak performance of 360 gigaflops.


3. Breaking News

Microsoft Patches Critical XML Flaw, 12 Other Bugs
Some of the updates patch vulnerabilities that hackers have been exploiting for weeks.

Microsoft Unleashes Forefront Security Suite
The software giant is looking to edge out third parties with its big new foray into security, which includes antivirus and anti-spyware for the client and two server offerings. Analysts say it's a good first step.

Microsoft Forms Interoperability Alliance With Other Tech Vendors
The goal of the Interoperability Vendor Alliance is for software and hardware vendors to work with Microsoft to make their products work better together, based on input by customers.

IBM Unveils $100 Million Innovation Agenda
CEO Sam Palmisano says the company has opened its labs, its "crown jewels," to help create 10 offerings that will support advanced consumer and business products and services.

CSC Wins $180 Million Outsourcing Deal
CSC will manage IT operations for all of Newmont's global shared services operations and regional gold mining facilities, including locations in Denver, Nevada, Ghana, Peru, and Australia.

Need An Occasional Boost In Bandwidth? AT&T Has It
AT&T's Optical Mesh Service is aimed at business and wholesale customers that need to constantly reallocate bandwidth to respond to changing business conditions.

Livermore Labs Turns To Linux-Based Supercomputing Clusters
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will get 100 teraflops combined processing power out of the supercomputer when it has all four of its new clusters up and running.

Former HP Chair Patricia Dunn To Be Arraigned Today
Dunn and others are accused of breaking four laws as they investigated leaks from Hewlett-Packard board meetings.

Court Shutters Spyware Outfit, Freezes Assets
ERG Ventures is accused of spreading spyware and adware on the Internet using the notorious Media Motor program.

Microsoft May Deploy Wireless Patch
Microsoft said it would consider using its automatic update services to distribute fixes for the vulnerability in Broadcom's wireless driver.

Zune Sales No Sellout
Microsoft's portable music player moved up to as high as No. 6 on Amazon.com's top seller list for electronics, behind the iPod and iPod Nano.

Aperture's Vista 500 Aims To Give IT Managers More Control Over Data Centers
Vista 500 gives IT managers a window on power consumption and can track blade server provisioning, among other things, the company said.

Java Look-Alike Project Pushed Sun To Make Java Open Source
The Apache Software Foundation still plans to develop an open source Java implementation of its own.

All Our Latest News

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Go In Depth On The Topics That Matter Most.
Visit the InformationWeek Download site to help you as you analyze and make purchase decisions on critical technology solutions. The site gives you exclusive access to the original InformationWeek reports in an easy-to-read format. Topics covered include security and privacy, business intelligence and analytics, networking and infrastructure, data center, and mobile and wireless.

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4. Grab Bag

The Business Side Of Web 2.0 (Wirednews.com)
Can the same software trends that launched a thousand media startups help entrepreneurs compete with the big guns? You bet.

Building A Better Computer (BusinessWeek)
PC makers are racing to ensure that tomorrow's machines meet the increasing demand for information and entertainment anywhere, all the time.

Slideshow: Next Year's Coolest Gadgets (Fortune.com)
On a recent prowl through Tokyo's electronic alleyways, Fortune's tech guru, Peter Lewis, was drawn to six stylish products. None is available in the United States, but that may just be a matter of time.

Tech's Got Pals On Capitol Hill (Business 2.0)
From 'net neutrality' to foreign worker visas, the new Congress may be the most technology-friendly in history.


5. In Depth: China, The Newest Frontier In IT

Where Research, Startups, And Endless Opportunities Are Changing The IT World
A chronicle of one jam-packed week in the R&D labs, universities, and businesses of Beijing.

Special Report: Live From China
InformationWeek does some exploring of this strange new world, as editor at large Aaron Ricadela spends some quality time in Beijing, soaking up information about the IT industry in China and reporting it back home. Complementing our stories is a complete package of videos, blog entries, and several podcasts, which we link to here.

CIOs In China
InformationWeek China's CIO survey shows that these IT executives are making strides, but they still fall short of reaching their goal. In China, CIOs are still struggling to define their business roles.

Photo Essay Image Gallery

Video: Chinese To Overtake English As Top Internet Language
Rory Cowan, CEO of Lionbridge Technologies, describes how Chinese is likely to overtake English as the main language of the Internet. Lionbridge employs more than 5,000 independent translators that use Internet technology to translate tech materials into dozens of foreign languages.

Blog: Report From China—Chairman Hu And Chairman Gates
It's my last round of interviews in China, and I'm sitting on a black leather chair across from Harry Shum, the head of Microsoft's Asia research lab, on the day (Nov. 8) Microsoft finally released Windows Vista to manufacturing.

IBM To Help Educate China's Outsourcing Pros
IBM will work with China's Ministry of Education to introduce a curriculum that will focus on case studies of real businesses and scientific programs and draw on computer science, operations research, industrial engineering, management sciences, and other disciplines.


6. Voice Of Authority

Web 3.0 Bombs Among Bloggers
Web 3.0 is dead on arrival. In Sunday's New York Times, respected technology journalist John Markoff detailed the coming of Web 3.0—the movement to imbue digital data with meaning so that it can be better understood by computers—and the blogosphere shot the idea down in cold prose.


7. White Papers

Three Steps To Getting A Grip On Development Costs
The Standish Group estimates that 30% of software projects are canceled, almost 50% are over budget, and 60% fail because of coding errors, bugs, and failure to meet deadlines. Development managers may think they don't have an impact on profitability, but they directly impact the risks of system outages, application failures, and exploding project schedules.


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