Software // Information Management
News
8/24/2007
05:21 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Internet Users Experience More Content, Less Talk

As of May 2007, Internet users spent 47% of their time online consuming content, compared with 34% in 2003, according to the Center for Media Research.

The lament of the lovelorn, "We never talk anymore," might well be applied to the Internet.

Internet users are communicating less and consuming more content than they were four years ago, according to the Center for Media Research.

The Center for Media Research is a part of MediaPost Communications, which produces online content and is thus not entirely disinterested in such findings.

The Center for Media Research cites a recent a four-year analysis of the Online Publishers Association's Internet Activity Index, which measures how Internet users divide their time among e-commerce, communications, content, and search.

Earlier this month, the OPA reported that as of May 2007, Internet users spent 47% of their time online consuming content, compared with 34% in 2003, which represents a 37% increase over four years.

The organization also found that, during the same period, Internet users spent 33% of their time online communicating, compared with 46% in 2003, which represents a 28% decline over four years.

Search usage is also up. In 2003, search consumed 3% of time online. Today, it's 5%, a 67% increase.

The OPA attributes these changes to a faster Internet, which is encouraging more Internet usage; the popularity of online video; improved search technology, which is helping people find more content; an overall increase in the amount of content online; and increased use of instant messaging, which is more time-efficient than e-mail.

On a related note, a recent study commissioned by IBM shows that people are spending more time using the Internet for personal purposes at home and at work than they do watching television.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July 22, 2014
Sophisticated attacks demand real-time risk management and continuous monitoring. Here's how federal agencies are meeting that challenge.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.