Interop
Commentary
11/21/2013
00:00 AM
Natalie Timms
Natalie Timms
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Securing The Software-Defined Network

SDNs offer the ability to centralize and automate network security functions, but only if security requirements are implemented correctly from the ground up. Learn how to secure the many components of the SDN.

With the emergence of software-defined networks (SDNs), security must become a core component of the network. Network security can no longer be an afterthought, or added with the assumption that it will "just work" on top of an existing network. With SDN, security services are pre-planned and become the foundation for connectivity. The benefits are centralized policy management, automated provisioning, and real-time mitigation. Sounds good, right?

The problem is the security perks you get from SDN are only as good as what you build into the system from the start. If any element or interaction in the SDN model can be compromised, the integrity of the whole network can be affected.

Integrating Security And SDN

Regardless of the architectural model or the controller-agent communication protocol you choose, SDNs provide perimeter security to an organization. Yes, networks still have a perimeter in terms of today's threat landscape. The perimeter, however, is no longer a single boundary or device dividing outside from inside.

The whole concept of the Internet of everything, where any IP-based device connected to a network may pose a threat, requires each network element or function within an organization be secured in its own right. SDNs address this issue, because agents and controllers can be provisioned to provide perimeters to individual devices or services.

Read the rest of this article at Network Computing.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.