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7/26/2007
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iPhone Revolution Is Succeeding

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: What Do We Really Want From Linux?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Apple's Quarterly Earnings Show The iPhone Revolution Is Succeeding
    - Apple Unlikely To Budge Anytime Soon On iPhone Pricing
3. Breaking News
    - Microsoft CEO Defends Move Beyond Desktop
    - Sprint, Google Hook Up For WiMax Services
    - New Bill Proposes 'Health Record Trusts' That Pay Doctors To Use E-Health Records
    - Motorola Taps COO Greg Brown For Board
    - Verizon Supports Some 'Open' Measures Of 700-MHz Auction
    - Forget Users; It's External Customers That Count
    - Sony Posts Record $826 Million First-Quarter Profit
    - MySpace Defends Efforts To Vet Sex Predators
    - Half Of Tech Employers Looking To Fill Jobs By End Of 2007, Survey Finds
    - Google Earth Enterprise Gains Web Browser Integration
4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
    - Smartphone Plus Projector Equals Road Warrior Heaven
    - AT&T's iPhone Sales Disappoint Stockholders -- EVERYBODY PANIC!
    - VideoJug: Video With Veracity
    - 25 Days With An iPhone
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Eight Challenges Of Information Privacy And Security Law Facing The Fax Industry
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Too much of a good thing is wonderful." -- Mae West


1. Editor's Note: What Do We Really Want From Linux?

After my last blog post about the real-world cost of Linux, I was struck by the contrast between my words and fellow InformationWeek blogger Alexander Wolfe's take on all this. He's lamented the broad variety of distributions out there and found fault with the way those who create Linux distributions seem unwilling to accept what users really want. I figured I should lay out my own arguments.

First off, let me state my own position regarding Linux. On a day-to-day basis, I'm a casual Linux user. It hasn't eclipsed Windows on my personal desktop, and that's mostly because there's still a lot that I use Windows for in a work environment -- testing software and hardware, mainly. I like Windows for what it is, but I've come to like Linux for what it is, too.

Now: What about Alex's two issues? First off, I don't think the broad number of Linux distributions out there is a bad thing, except in the sense that it makes it difficult to choose where to begin. This is definitely a problem, for both pros and beginners, but you could no more slim down the number of distributions out there than you could selectively turn off the stars. It makes more sense instead to provide people with a way to efficiently choose the right distro for the right job.

What we need is a better way to decide those things, and in fact I came across something that comes close -- the Linux Distribution Chooser. However, I think it starts off on entirely the wrong foot and asks too many questions to get the needed information. It's an area that badly needs more work.

Second is the perception of what the average user wants or needs. This can be a tricky issue to pick through for a bunch of reasons -- a major one being that the pros tend to forget that less-technically-savvy users are simply not as obsessed with the way the system works.

A regular user will say something like, "I'd like to deal with my e-mail and browse the Web and write my novel." The exact way they get those things done isn't as important, as long as they can get them done in a relatively straightforward fashion. Windows and the Mac offer more deliberately closed-ended ways to get there, while Linux offers a plurality of ways to get there. Again, choosing a distro is often the issue -- but, that said, the vast majority of distributions are so specialized that this is not as bad an issue as it might seem. It usually boils down to something like Ubuntu vs. Red Hat.

I do agree that there must be incarnations of Linux that are as comfortable as possible to use on the desktop -- something for Joe CD-ROM, as it were. But I don't believe the whole of Linux as we know it has to be remade to make that possible.

What do you think? Do you agree that the abundance of Linux distros is a good thing, or do you think that too much of a good thing is -- too much? Leave a comment at the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Serdar Yegulalp
thegline@optonline.net
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Apple's Quarterly Earnings Show The iPhone Revolution Is Succeeding
AT&T sold more iPhones in their first weekend than any other device, and Apple says more consumers will buy iPhones in the first quarter of sales than bought iPods in their first seven quarters.

Related Story:

Apple Unlikely To Budge Anytime Soon On iPhone Pricing
Apple expects to sell 1 million iPhones by the end of September and 10 million by next June.


3. Breaking News

Microsoft CEO Defends Move Beyond Desktop
Chief executive Steve Ballmer defended the software company's expansion beyond its Windows and Office software businesses, saying Web services and consumer devices are key to the company's future.

Sprint, Google Hook Up For WiMax Services
For Google, the deal provides access to Sprint WiMax subscribers who will presumably be eager to use the Web-based tools on the go, at no or little cost.

New Bill Proposes 'Health Record Trusts' That Pay Doctors To Use E-Health Records
Under the proposal, the records managed by the trust would travel with the individual through life and not be controlled or owned by any particular health care provider, employer, payer, or other party.

Motorola Taps COO Greg Brown For Board
Brown, who has an extensive telecommunications background, is seen as a possible successor to Motorola's chairman and chief executive, Ed Zander.

Verizon Supports Some 'Open' Measures Of 700-MHz Auction
The company shifts its views as FCC commissioners prepare for a vote next week to set ground rules for the auction.

Forget Users; It's External Customers That Count
Design business systems to serve the market, not your employees, columnist Seybold says.

Sony Posts Record $826 Million First-Quarter Profit
Sony said its first-quarter profit more than tripled, with strong digital camera sales outweighing losses on the PlayStation 3.

MySpace Defends Efforts To Vet Sex Predators
The social networking site responds to an attorney general claim that the site contains more than 29,000 sex offender profiles.

Half Of Tech Employers Looking To Fill Jobs By End Of 2007, Survey Finds
Nearly half of the IT employers queried said they have open job positions for which they cannot find qualified candidates.

Google Earth Enterprise Gains Web Browser Integration
The updated software will allow IT administrators to embed a 2-D view of Google Earth data into any Web application and to make enterprise mashups.

All Our Latest News

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----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Web 2.0 Applications
This InformationWeek Research report, Enterprise 2.0, will provide a glimpse into the adoption of Web 2.0 applications in the enterprise environment.

10th Annual Information Security Survey
InformationWeek Research's 10th annual Information Security survey, a joint research project with Accenture, examines security issues such as security investments and priorities.

-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/consumerpersonal_tech/index.html

Smartphone Plus Projector Equals Road Warrior Heaven
Imagine you're about to deliver the PowerPoint you slaved over for weeks. Just as you set up, the projector in the room goes dead. What do you do? Why not use the projector on your smartphone?

AT&T's iPhone Sales Disappoint Stockholders -- EVERYBODY PANIC!
AT&T reported robust early sales for the iPhone -- but not robust enough. Investors expected more, and the price of Apple stock dropped as a result.

VideoJug: Video With Veracity
A new site called VideoJug is determined to become the expert version of YouTube -- where you can find how-to videos for everything from etiquette to earthquake survival.

25 Days With An iPhone
Like our reviewer John Welch, I've been living with the iPhone since it first came out, so I was very eager to read his in-depth review of the device.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

McFadyen Consulting seeking eBusiness Project Manager in Vienna, VA

Talent Mindset Resources seeking Senior QA Manager in Hartford, CT

The NPD Group seeking Computer Operator in Port Washington, NY

University of Maryland seeking PeopleSoft Tech Lead, Student Administration in Adelphi, MD

Talent Mindset Resources seeking Serena Senior Change Management Analyst in Hartford, CT

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Eight Challenges Of Information Privacy And Security Law Facing The Fax Industry
Sarbanes Oxley, HIPAA, and Gramm-Leach-Bliley are three federal laws that require secure handling of information either to keep it private or to make it available on demand. This paper will discuss each of these laws and the real impact they can have on fax management if information is mishandled.


7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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