Strategic CIO // Executive Insights & Innovation
Commentary
3/31/2008
06:05 PM
John Soat
John Soat
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

CIO As Acquisition Partner

Is the CIO an effective position to enlist in your company's mergers and acquisitions strategy? It makes sense, given that integration is one of the major challenges in an M&A move, particularly integration of the IT variety.

Is the CIO an effective position to enlist in your company's mergers and acquisitions strategy? It makes sense, given that integration is one of the major challenges in an M&A move, particularly integration of the IT variety. Crowe Chizek, an accounting and consulting firm in Oak Brook, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, has tapped Yvonne Scott as its new CIO. According to a company statement:

"Yvonne's experience in information technology, visioning, strategy development and **mergers and acquisitions** [emphasis mine] will help Crowe maximize operational efficiency and assist us as we continue to grow the firm," said Crowe CEO Chuck Allen.

Before signing on with Crowe Chizek, Scott was senior VP and CIO for several years at GATX Corp., a company that specializes in asset management and financial services in the railroad and steamship industries. Apparently, Scott left GATX a few months ago: The company announced a new senior VP and CIO in January.

CIOs take note: Selling expertise in supporting mergers and acquisitions looks to be a good career move, in particular as a way of raising your executive profile and business value. So increasing your M&A experience by volunteering to work on merger projects from inception to completion will probably pay dividends later on,

What do you think? Is the CIO already involved in the M&A strategy at your company? And does that include working on the front end, to helping to plan future moves? Or is it simply at the back end, as the person who puts the technology pieces together?

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 18, 2014
Enterprise social network success starts and ends with integration. Here's how to finally make collaboration click.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.