Government // Mobile & Wireless
Commentary
2/1/2012
03:38 PM
Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy
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Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?

You can bring your iPad to the Super Bowl. Should you be allowed to?

Ticketholders will be allowed to bring their iPads to the Super Bowl on Sunday. There's Wi-Fi at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, so spectators will have the option to stay connected while they're there.

Is that a good thing?

Sports franchises are facing the same question that companies across industries are facing: Just how much technology do their customers want, and how far should companies go to enable that technology use? Retailers, restaurants, resorts, cruise ships, country clubs--all are sorting this out.

The NFL says iPads are allowed at the Super Bowl. Lucas Oil Stadium offers this description of its Wi-Fi capability:

We've recently upgraded the Wi-Fi capability in Lucas Oil Stadium. Please help test the upgrades by connecting to Lucas Oil Stadium Wi-Fi network ("OpenWiFiLos") on your mobile device to catch that last play, check the latest stats, send text messages, emails, and photos to your friends.

Sports stadiums are far from unanimous in endorsing the latest technology. Yankee Stadium, for example, bans iPads, Kindles, and other tablets, saying they could distract fans who should be aware of foul balls or broken bats flying their way.

Bill Schlough, CIO of the San Francisco Giants (a.k.a. the IT pro with a World Series ring), takes a much different view. The Giants' AT&T Park has Wi-Fi throughout, accessed by more than 16% of fans during the 2011 season. "We feel that's part of the experience," Schlough told attendees at the most recent InformationWeek 500 Conference.

The Giants' opening day last year conflicted with the Masters golf tournament, and Schlough doesn't want people staying home to watch both events. He also wants fans at AT&T Park to tell their friends where they are, so that people who didn't come to the game feel like they missed out. During the 2010 playoffs, fans sent more content out over the park's Wi-Fi network--pictures, Facebook posts--than they downloaded.

I spoke with Wayne Wichlacz, director of IT for the Green Bay Packers (a.k.a. the IT pro with two Super Bowl rings), about this tech phenomenon last fall at a Society for Information Management meeting. The Packers' Lambeau Field doesn't offer widespread Wi-Fi access, though select areas do. Wichlacz says his organization needs to be careful that the stadium's technology adds to the game experience and doesn't distract from it.

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Understand, Lambeau Field has been sold out for every Packers game since 1960, 86,000 people are on the season ticket waiting list, and less than 100 people a year give up their tickets. The Packers don't want to do anything to mess with that good thing. Plus, do you really want to take your gloves off to use an iPad during a December game at Lambeau, home to the infamous Ice Bowl? The club handed out 70,000 free hand warmers to fans at the Packer's most recent playoff game, on Jan. 15.

Companies need a nuanced understanding of their customers to get this technology decision right. Royal Caribbean cruise lines this month will provide iPads in every stateroom on its Splendour of the Seas ship as part of a multimillion-dollar renovation. It also improved Wi-Fi throughout the ship for better coverage.

Read the comments on one online article about Royal Caribbean providing iPads, and a third of them are from people who want to turn off technology and unplug on cruises. But CIO Bill Martin insists that less than 10% of its customers want to unplug. "Increasingly, we see tech natives on the ship," he says.

So what's it going to be: Bring your iPad to the Super Bowl along with your binoculars and seat cushion, or would you prefer a more traditional experience?

To find out more about Chris Murphy, please visit his page.

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TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/14/2012 | 10:06:40 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
That's a good point. Back in the days before Jumbotrons, people would bring transistor radios or little TVs to hear the commentators, or see instant replays. People can do that now, on smartphones, and there's no effectve way to ban those devices. What is different about an iPad vs. a smartphone?
RainyDayInterns
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RainyDayInterns,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2012 | 5:14:59 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
What you say may be true, but should the stadium be allowed to banned their use during a game? Seems kind of a reach as to what they are allow to control.
RainyDayInterns
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RainyDayInterns,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2012 | 5:13:06 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
The point made by the Yankees is totally lame. Do we really need them to be our nannies?
RainyDayInterns
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RainyDayInterns,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2012 | 5:09:40 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
If it does hot interfere with someone else's enjoyment of the event, why should it matter at all? As to the Yankee Stadium policy, it is completely disingenuous. If they were REALLY worried about their fans getting injured, they would put up a clear barrier.
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/3/2012 | 5:26:30 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
I looked at this from an entirely different angle -- breakage and loss. I can put my smartphone in my pocket when I go to a sporting event, and it will stay relatively safe. Maybe I get hit by a pickpocket, maybe not. But iPads are much larger, and they're wayyy too easy to drop. I would feel really stupid replacing my $700 iPad because it fell out of my hands in the stands, or someone stole it while I was going to the bathroom. Bottom line: there are some locations where it really doesn't make sense to take your expensive tech devices.
dgreen600
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dgreen600,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/2/2012 | 8:57:22 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
Depends on the event, I guess. The Yankees make a good point about being aware in the stands, as most people at the games I go to aren't paying attention to anything around them to begin with -- an iPad would only make it worse. But, I think for events like March Madness, it would definitely come in handy during the down times. When you're going to the Big 10 Tournament, you're fine watching the later mathups like Michigan-Wisconsin or MSU vs. OSU...but early on, if Purdue's playing Northwestern, and there's nothing else to do, it gets pretty boring, and an iPad would come in handy.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
2/2/2012 | 8:26:00 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
I tend to agree with you Lois, i find the tech distracting. I have to admit, though, that lately i have used my iPad to video my kids' basketball and indoor soccer games, when my wife was at other events. So perhaps we'll have "no tech" sections at some point, like the no smoking sections of old or like the "family" sections with no alcohol.
herman_munster
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herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/2/2012 | 7:49:37 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
I thought at first that maybe you were trolling but, sadly your ridiculous comment echoes a sentiment that far too many people in our society actually hold.

If a zealot were to attack a stadium full of people, they wouldn't waste their time with trying to rig a tablet size delivery device that worked well enough to fool security. If some zealot wanted to attack a stadium full of people, they would use a much cruder and much more effective device.

Stop living in irrational fear.
EVVJSK
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EVVJSK,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/2/2012 | 7:06:18 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
NO !
aarons334
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aarons334,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/2/2012 | 6:57:33 PM
re: Do iPads Belong At Sporting Events?
Who's to prevent some zealot from bringing in some harmful substance or creative WMD contained in the tablet to set off in the middle of a crowd. If I've thought of it, they (al Quaida, and others) already have. Unfortunately that is the state of the world today.
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