Strategic CIO // Executive Insights & Innovation
Commentary
2/5/2010
11:36 AM
Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy
Commentary
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Schwartz's Haiku, And The Problem With Blogging CEOs

Ex-Sun CEO Jonathan Schwartz has Tweeted his resignation haiku, and now promises to return to blogging--now that he's no longer in a position of influence and power. And that's what's wrong with CEO bloggers.

Ex-Sun CEO Jonathan Schwartz has Tweeted his resignation haiku, and now promises to return to blogging--now that he's no longer in a position of influence and power. And that's what's wrong with CEO bloggers.Schwartz was the best of the CEO bloggers for awhile. Remember when he blogged passionately on why Sun was changing its ticker symbol to JAVA, only to take a holy flogging by many who thought he was fiddling while Sun burned? Schwartz laid out his thinking and let those comments rage unobstructed.

Yet for the past nine months, when people were most interested in what he was thinking, he didn't blog. His explanation is in his post from late January, that with the Oracle deal pending there was simply no option:

You've probably seen the news -- the Sun/Oracle transaction has closed. With the passing of that milestone, I can once again speak freely.

We've created the situation where, in times of uncertainty, when we most care what a CEO has to say, silence is considered the letter of the law and candor is verboten. Regulators have all but mandated this muzzle, in the face of the undeniably difficult task of balancing information flow and the risk of market manipulation. But are we really better off for not hearing boo from Schwartz for nine months?

Related recent links on Oracle-Sun: Oracle Bringing Its Support Fee Philosophy To Sun Oracle-Sun: The OnStar To Your Data Center? Oracle CEO Ellison: Sun Will Be Profitable In February Oracle's Ellison: We'll Grab Share By Going Direct Oracle: We're Hiring Sales, Tech Staff

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.