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11/14/2011
09:31 AM
Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy
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Why Ford Just Became A Software Company

Ford is upgrading its in-vehicle software on a huge scale, embracing all the customer expectations and headaches that come with the development lifecycle.

Sometime early next year, Ford will mail USB sticks to about 250,000 owners of vehicles with its advanced touchscreen control panel. The stick will contain a major upgrade to the software for that screen. With it, Ford is breaking from a history as old as the auto industry, one in which the technology in a car essentially stayed unchanged from assembly line to junk yard.

Ford is significantly changing what a driver or passenger experiences in its cars years after they’re built. And with it, Ford becomes a software company--with all the associated high customer expectations and headaches.

Ford is making a major upgrade to its MyFord Touch interface, which is an in-dash touchscreen that offers controls for navigation, music, phone integration, and temperature. For has offered the touchscreen on select vehicles since the fall of 2010. The new code promises to speed up the system's response and un-clutter the interface, adding features and responding to complaints about version 1. Ford's also updating the Sync software that's behind the MyFord Touch interface, adding tablet integration and better voice response. Ford will offer this upgraded version on 2013 Escape, Flex, and Taurus models hitting showrooms early next year, as well as the upgrade for existing owners.

The update's addressing shortcomings of MyFord Touch 1.0--such as having buttons too small for use while driving and too much information on the screens--but this isn't an emergency move, Ford insists. Ford always planned to make improvements to the software over a car's life. "We plan to do it constantly," says Gary Jablonski, manager of Sync Platform Development.

Ford has done revisions of its Sync software before, but never anything on this scale. In the past, it has had customers log onto a website and download an upgrade to a USB drive that they then plug into their vehicle. Or they could bring their car to their dealer for the upgrade. But Ford wants more customers to get into this download-and-upgrade habit. That's why it's mailing out the USB sticks, as well as keeping the option to take the vehicle to a dealer for the upgrade. "We want customers to expect that about Sync," Jablonski says.

[ Want more on IT's changing role? Read 9 Critical Trends For Innovative IT. ]

One example of why such changes matter: Pandora, the online music streaming service, was a little-known startup when Ford launched its Sync software in 2007. As smartphones made Pandora a hit among young would-be buyers, Ford in 2010 added support for Pandora as one of the first smartphone apps integrated with Sync. Similarly, this update lets drivers connect their tablets to the Sync system, just as they can their smartphones, to access music and other apps using voice commands.

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pfischer681
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pfischer681,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/2/2011 | 7:12:32 AM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
I own a 2011 Ford Edge and I downloaded the new update two weeks ago and dropped it on a flash drive and plugged it in to my ford and after a 30 minute upgrade all was fine. The voice recognition works great and the whole software package makes me more nimble and efficient. Using Microsoft Sync and MyFord Touch is like using any other interface and that is the "key" is to figure out what you need and just use it as an active input. Make technology an active interface for you as opposed to a passive one.

Microsoft Sync running in a new Ford makes MyFord Touch the next big thing. Watch as all other car companies jump in as there's no finish line in this race.....

ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2011 | 1:06:35 PM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
Ford is trying to get more people like you --- it's mailing out the USB drives in hopes of seeding the habit, getting people comfortable with downloading. That's a big part of what's changing -- not just that Ford chooses to do continual software updates, but that customers come to expect it and take advantage of it as well.
nanana
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nanana,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/20/2011 | 10:13:01 AM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
While I share your view I can certainly understand that some of the "non-power users" would need a stick sent by snail mail.
GPOTTER1233
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GPOTTER1233,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2011 | 4:02:11 PM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
I guess there wasn't much fanfare and you missed it but we passed that Rubicon a year or more ago. I own a 2010 Ford Mustang with Sync and I've installed two major software updates over the past two years. Honestly, snail mailing out flash drives seems like a step backwards from the previous practice of sending out an email with a link to the download and installation instructions.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
11/16/2011 | 4:32:58 PM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
Ralph, thanks for sharing your experience. You touch on a key idea -- there's no shortage of deep tech talent at places like Ford. But even given that depth, learning to develop and support and update a customer-facing piece of software is a different ball game. And more companies are going to need their tech teams to play that game.
ANON1242306966576
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ANON1242306966576,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/15/2011 | 7:13:37 PM
re: Why Ford Just Became A Software Company
It's been over 30 years since I worked as a contractor for Ford's Computer Science Department, but I certainly remember it being state of the art at that time. In particular, providing my first exposure to structured software development methods and tools. Admittedly, the software being developed was for support of Engineering R&D activities, e.g. crash simulation and analysis, not embeded embeded real-time systems.

Ralph McNall
Building A Mobile Business Mindset
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