Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days - InformationWeek
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1/6/2015
09:33 AM
Doug Henschen
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Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days

Amazon Echo crosses Siri with Sonos to create a "smart" speaker that can summon information as well as music. It's promising, but here's where it falls short.

CES 2015 Preview: 8 Hot Trends
CES 2015 Preview: 8 Hot Trends
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

There's much to like about Echo, Amazon's blending of a natural-language-savvy personal assistant and a connected speaker. But after 10 days of use, it strikes me as an experiment in progress and a first step toward bigger things.

Is Echo Amazon's answer to Apple Siri, Microsoft Cortana, and natural-language access to Google through Android devices? Or is this Amazon's hat in the ring of the connected speaker market, led by the likes of Sonos, Jawbone, and Bose?

My experiments confirm that Echo doesn't really match either comparison, but this hybrid device just might establish a category all its own, assuming Amazon can deliver on its promise to add more services and capabilities.

[Want more on the latest devices? Read CES 2015 Preview: 8 Hot Trends.]

Amazon is being rather mysterious about its intentions for Echo. For starters, the device was introduced with an invitation-only release on November 6. Limited-time pricing was set at $99 for Amazon Prime members and $199 for non-members, though that pricing still stands at this writing.

I'm a Prime member, so $99 didn't seem like a budget buster. I was also intrigued by the Amazon video showing a family peppering Echo with questions and requests: Alexa: Play rock music … Alexa: What time is it? ... Alexa: How tall is Mount Everest? ... Alexa: Add wrapping paper to my shopping list.

Echo uses seven built-in microphones to continuously listen for a "wake word" -- in this case, "Alexa" -- and you can follow that with a variety of questions or commands. With all those mics, Echo can hear you from just about anywhere in the same room without your having to shout. If you're too far away you can speak into Echo's remote or use its controls to advance to the next track or turn music up or down.

Behind the scenes, your requests and questions are connected with music-streaming services or online information sources such as Wikipedia. Echo confirms each request or responds to your questions in a pleasant, female voice. "Rock music" … "It's 12:34" … "Mount Everest's height above sea level is 29,029 feet, 8,848 meters" … "I've put wrapping paper or your shopping list."

The "request an invite" sales approach is the first sign Echo is an experiment for Amazon. I didn't hear back on my request for more than a month, suggesting Amazon is manufacturing based on accumulated orders. Perhaps the caution is due to the stinging failure of the Amazon Fire Phone, which fell well short of sales expectations last year.

Solid and simple
My first impression of Echo was the heft of the box when it finally arrived. Inside the black, unmarked box was the cylindrical, 3.27-inch-around by 9.25-inch-high tower, along with a palm-sized 1.5-inch by 5.5-inch remote. The solid-feeling, black plastic tower houses a 2.5-inch woofer and 2-inch tweeter. Judging by the tower's two-pound-plus weight, both speakers have hefty magnets.

Setup was simple. You download and use the Echo App (for Android, iOS, or Amazon Fire devices or desktop browsers) to interactively configure access to your WiFi network, enable location services, and register the device to your Amazon account. When the light ring atop the tower turns blue, Echo is ready to take your requests.

There's Echo, the speaker tower with built-in microphones, and then there's the cloud-based, voice-interactive service that runs on Echo. My first disappointment was learning that you can't give the service a unique persona -- at least not yet. I wanted to call it "HAL" and give it a disturbingly calm, male voice -- à la 2001: A Space Odyssey. Alas, you can only choose between "Alexa" and "Amazon" as the wake word (though Amazon says it's considering more options), and you're stuck with one, ever-polite female voice. I stuck with "Alexa," but she's got nothing on "Samantha," the sexy operating system given voice by Scarlett Johansson in the movie Her.

It's pretty easy to imagine Amazon adding Alexa to the next Fire Phone. I asked her for local weather and news updates, as suggested in the Echo app. The service uses text-to-speech capabilities to recite "Flash Briefings" from sources including Associated Press, NPR, and the BBC. You can customize these briefings to include top stories, US news, world news, business, sports, entertainment, tech, and more.

You can ask ad-hoc questions, such as, "How do you spell onomatopoeia?" Alexa got that last question right, but it's easy to stump her, particularly with topical questions. Alexa had no answer for "Who won the 2014 Major League Baseball World Series?" or "Who won Sunday's Dallas Cowboys versus Detroit Lions football playoff game?" Apple's Siri also missed that recent football trivia question, but it nailed the World Series question and even noted the score of the last game between the winning Giants and the Royals.

When Alexa can't answer a question, it responds with a variation on: "Sorry, I don't have the answer to that question, but I've added a Bing search to the Echo app." Checking this long list, Alexa usually interpreted my voice correctly, but it just wasn't set up to retrieve the desired information. It's best suited to retrieving spellings, definitions, or facts related to famous people, dates, and places: What's the capital of Spain? ... How many people live in New Orleans? ... How many kilometers in a mile? What was Bruce Springsteen's first album? You get the idea.

Alexa can also tell jokes, but let's just say it shouldn't quit its day job.

Limited personal assistance
If Amazon intends to embed Alexa in a phone, it's going to have to link it to email, calendaring, and messaging services. Echo isn't a personal mobile device, so don't expect these routine smartphone capabilities. Alexa also can't retrieve maps, offer directions, or answer questions such as, "What's the number for Cousin's Pizza in Norwood, N.J.?" Siri recited that number in a flash, so I wasn't about to open the Echo app and search Bing results. Siri and Cortana also let you dictate and send texts and email messages, which is not something Alexa can handle.

Alexa can set timers and alarms, but only one timer and one alarm at a time, and you're limited to requests within the next 24 hours. There's no calendar

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Doug Henschen is Executive Editor of InformationWeek, where he covers the intersection of enterprise applications with information management, business intelligence, big data and analytics. He previously served as editor in chief of Intelligent Enterprise, editor in chief of ... View Full Bio
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spembert
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spembert,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/8/2015 | 3:57:40 AM
Amazon Echo shipping to me
I responded to Amazon's offer on November 6. Received email from Amazon on January 6 that I could place my order ($99). Received email shortly after that I would receive echo on February 18. Received email from Amazon late February 7 that I would receive echo on February 11.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/12/2015 | 3:03:58 PM
Re: Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days
@Li Tan- The Echo is definitely attempt to prevent (or at least control) that matrix you are describing. I think one of the major challenges of the next 20 years is simply making machines fit into our lives in an organic, human way. Echo seems to be the best effort of this I've seen. Far better than Siri or Cortana or any I've seen because it also fits into the living space. That said, it needs a few more iterations.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/10/2015 | 9:25:26 PM
Re: Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days
There are still some improvements needed for Amazon Echo but I do agree with your point - the most important part of it is changing the way we interact with machines. This is the step forward to integrate smart machines/IT products into our inner life cycle. But will it happen that soon we are living inside matrix of machines/IT equipments?
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/10/2015 | 9:25:07 PM
Re: Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days
There are still some improvements needed for Amazon Echo but I do agree with your point - the most important part of it is changing the way we interact with machines. This is the step forward to integrate smart machines/IT products into our inner life cycle. But will it happen that soon we are living inside matrix of machines/IT equipments?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
1/8/2015 | 11:14:24 AM
Re: Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days
I like this as the first step in divorcing the computer from the box and putting it into our lifestyle. Even with a phone, if I want to know somehting or do something I have to take out my tiny box and interact with it. Or i go to my big desk box. Something like this takes a lot of computer management out of the box. As it commands more things ("alexa, tell Nest to turn up the heat" or "Alexa, tell my self-driving car to pick up the kids at school) it turns into the most unobtrusive way to mange your life. 
BryanG987
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BryanG987,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/7/2015 | 2:22:05 PM
Re: Echoing the first ten days
I'd like to be able to count on Amazon Music for serious consumption. The downside to Sonos / iTunes, etc is that they can access my purhased library, but not the songs that I add to my library through Prime. So far, the playlist problem outweighs the benefits of the Prime music for me as well, but if Amazon would improve that, it could swing the pendulum for me from iTunes to Amazon Music as I would probably add a lot more of the Prime music into my library.

I've done voice training a couple of times and it still seems like the "V" as a "C" is the one thing it still trips on, but that also doesn't seem to come up on the voice training. Their voice training works with a lot of very common phrases (like "Play my briefing report") and doesn't seem to really go after your custom names or anything at this point.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2015 | 2:18:21 PM
Re: Amazon Echo: My First 10 Days
I'm with most of the rest of you on this one - it seems like this product fits into a grey area, and while the value appears to be there, I'm also a little unsure of who the target audience for it is (indeed, it seems like Amazon might not be sure either). For what it's worth, this article is the first I'm hearing of Echo, but this seems like quite a solid review, Doug, and it looks like you've covered just about everything. I was wondering a bit about the smartphone and desktop integration, but happy to see that's covered here in the comments. I think Lorna makes a good point, though; maybe not with 'firmware updates' per se but it seems like a lot of the missing functionality could be added later. For example, e-mail integration seems possible if the smartphone app is just pushing text to read from your phone to the Echo.

If we consider the whole thing to be a beta of sorts, then most of the shortcoming are forgivable, but nevertheless some of these decisions seem strange from Amazon. Only being able to keep one alarm at a time? I don't see how there was a technical barrrier there, or why they wouldn't think people would have a use for that. The video showcases how the Echo is a little more family-oriented than a Siri, but as BryanG points out there are some hitches with that as well - you don't want your kids buying stuff on Amazon without your say-so. If it's just looking stuff up online, I don't see why it has to limit the sources it uses. I could go on, but we'll just have to see what Amazon plans long-term. At the $99 price, it seems like quite a deal, but the $200 general price seems to relegate it to a more niche category - I'm just not sure what that niche is.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2015 | 12:39:06 PM
Re: Echoing the first ten days
Amazon and every tech supplier wants to appeal to the public at large. I'd think of Echo in the context of the connected speaker market. You can find Sonos, Bose and Jambox speakers at Best Buy and even at some Target stores. That's a sure sign that this is a mainstream category. Time will tell whether Amazon fills out its speaker line, takes Alexa in another direction or both.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2015 | 12:24:10 PM
Re: Echoing the first ten days
Such release from Amazon will help them figure out what bugs it has and what areas it can improve.  As of now, they know many potential areas.  I'm sure future releases will improve.  My question is whether there is a consumer demand for such device?  You said that you can do many of its functionalities with a smartphone ( search info, timer, check personal calendar,etc).  Would this device by acquire just for tech enthusiast or the public at large.   
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2015 | 12:11:50 PM
Re: Echoing the first ten days
This is good feedback for others to think about. As for me, I'm not counting on Amazon Music or Echo for serious music consumption. For that I use Sonos (in the living room or family room) with either my iTunes library or Spotify. Amazon's Prime playlists are fine considering they're free, but I wouldn't pay for them.

As for that "Alexa/Alexis," problem, you can go into the Echo App Settings menu and change the wake work to "Amazon." You could also try "Voice Training" from the "Things to Try" menu and see if that improves Alexa's understanding of your "accent." I'm from the midwest as well, so in my view, it's all those people from the East, South and West who have the accents.
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