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3/15/2006
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Keeping Kids Safe Online

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Keeping Kids Safe Online
2. Today's Top Story
    - U.S. Cuts Demand For Google Data, Judge Is Favorable
    Related Stories:
    - Google Buys Maker Of 3D Modeling Software
    - Google To Offer Online Access To Books
3. Breaking News
    - Social Networking Connects For Businesses
    - Amazon Launches Storage Service That Could Bring Closer Competition With Google
    - Intel Adds Low-Voltage Xeon In Portfolio Revamp
    - Financial Industry Growth Predicted, But It's Hardly Money In The Bank
    - Internet Backlash Stalls Jersey Civility Bill
    - Vista Visuals: Windows Sidebar, Gadgets, Media Player 11, And More
    - Apple Misses Bugs, Offers Fix
    - Bloggers Try To Reach Journalist's Captors In Iraq
    - Red Hat, Novell Vie Over Linux Virtualization
    - Americans Want Banks To Spy On Their Accounts
    - Vonage, Skype Seen Leading VoIP Adoption
    - Suppliers Of In-Flight Cell Phones Stress Safety
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - Microsoft: EU Refused Open Hearing Request (Associated Press)
    - Broadband On The Range (USA Today)
5. In Depth: Technology And Your Health
    - Group Fingers Technology As Likely Cause Of Hearing Loss
    - Wearable Tech Is Alive And Well
    - Canadian College Curbs Wi-Fi Due To Health Risks
    - Wireless To Organize--And Maybe Save--Lives
    - U.N. Targets Tobacco Advertising On Internet
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Rob Carter, FedEx CIO, Talks About The '6x6 Transformation'
7. White Papers
    - The Business Case For Layer-3 IP VPNs
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"The best way to keep children home is to make the home atmosphere pleasant--and let the air out of the tires." -- Dorothy Parker


1. Editor's Note: Keeping Kids Safe Online

I'm no expert, but I am a parent of three teenagers who, thankfully, have been safe so far. My reaction to the news about Microsoft jumping into the monitoring space with a free tool to be available this summer is that it sounds great, but I hope parents realize that the use of any monitoring software isn't by itself enough to guarantee kids' safety.

I think anyone in the computer industry already knows this and certainly understands the dangers that lurk. But I worry there may be some parents who too readily trust a tool to take the place of their (human) care and concern. Parents must still be parents, and older teens especially must be made aware of their responsibility in this, too. With great freedom comes great personal responsibility, both online and offline, and kids need the adults in their lives to both explain and model this.

We've certainly been lucky, and we've done some things to help. (For the fuller story, please check out my blog entry.)

Just when I thought we were all getting the hang of this online stuff, however, came a whole host of other concerns with the advent of MySpace. This is true of any online chat environment, of course, but there are certain characteristics about MySpace that aren't true of other social networking sites popular in our household. Indeed, those features are often the reason for MySpace's popularity with the under-20 set: the ability to post photos and much information about yourself, including your favorite colors and bands, if you're a "chocolate" or "vanilla" person, and whether you like your parents.

I became very concerned about the risks of online chat, but my husband and I made little if any headway with our kids until a couple of things happened. First was that two of our girls' friends were getting into some very dangerous territory, in my opinion, by going to the mall (and elsewhere) to meet up in person with guys they had originally encountered only in chat rooms or social networking sites. One 15-year-old girl even posted photos of herself in clothes the circa-1980s Madonna would have worn, in an attempt to make herself look older and/or more desirable to "hot" guys. To their great credit, our kids were very concerned about their friends, and we talked about this.

The other thing that happened was that around this time, a national TV show aired that talked about online sexual predators. We all watched this show together, and my girls were appalled that people actually went to "their" sites with such nefarious intentions. Ultimately, both girls changed their MySpace profiles to contain much less identifying information, like the name of their high school and where they lived.

These days, we're all somewhat wiser about the risks of online chat rooms. My girls are now helping their friends understand what they've learned about how to be more responsible young adults. However sad I am that they needed to have learned this particular lesson, I'm very glad they did.

Johanna Ambrosio
jambrosio@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

U.S. Cuts Demand For Google Data, Judge Is Favorable
The government on Tuesday reduced the number of Google searches it wanted data on to just 50,000 Web addresses and roughly 5,000 search terms, down from the millions or potentially billions of addresses it had initially sought.

Related Stories:

Google Buys Maker Of 3D Modeling Software
Google's second acquisition this month, @Last Software makes tools for a general audience, not just design professionals.

Google To Offer Online Access To Books
The new service, which would be available through Google Book Search, would make books available only after a person signs in to his or her personal account. People would not be able to store a copy of the book in their computer or copy pages.


3. Breaking News

Social Networking Connects For Businesses
But the value provided by personal connection sites is murky, as is their potential for becoming profitable.

Amazon Launches Storage Service That Could Bring Closer Competition With Google
The online storage service will let developers pay only for the storage they use and tap into Amazon's Web computing infrastructure.

Intel Adds Low-Voltage Xeon In Portfolio Revamp
The new Intel processors will bring the company into competitive balance with rival Advanced Micro Devices.

Financial Industry Growth Predicted, But It's Hardly Money In The Bank
Securing customer data doesn't seem to be a priority for banks, a survey finds, despite recent data breach incidents.

Internet Backlash Stalls Jersey Civility Bill
A New Jersey lawmaker's attempt to legislate civility on an Internet discussion board runs into a wall of opposition from bloggers and others who see it as an attempt to stifle free speech.

Vista Visuals: Windows Sidebar, Gadgets, Media Player 11, And More
Scot Finnie shows you the first feature-complete beta of Windows Vista and analyzes what's new, including Windows Mail, Windows Sidebar, and Media Player 11.

Apple Misses Bugs, Offers Fix
Apple is sending out its second security update for Mac OS X in as many weeks, including follow-up fixes to bugs thought to have been patched on March 1st.

Bloggers Try To Reach Journalist's Captors In Iraq
The Internet is adding new momentum to the campaign urging Iraqi captors to release freelance reporter Jill Carroll. U.S. bloggers are linking to public service announcements airing on Iraqi television.

Red Hat, Novell Vie Over Linux Virtualization
Roughly a week before Novell kicks off its annual Brainshare conference and details Xen support in its next Linux upgrade, Red Hat is expected on Tuesday to detail Xen virtualization support in its own Linux upgrade due out in 2006.

Americans Want Banks To Spy On Their Accounts
Nine out of 10 Americans want their banks to monitor their online accounts for signs of suspicious behavior, much as credit card companies do now, according to a survey conducted by security vendor RSA Security.

Vonage, Skype Seen Leading VoIP Adoption
Voice over IP in U.S. homes is gaining traction--and Vonage, Skype, AT&T, and Google are among the market-share leaders.

Suppliers Of In-Flight Cell Phones Stress Safety
Two vendors of phones used on airplanes noted that a recent Carnegie Mellon study, which questioned the safety of cell phones on flights, covered a time period some three years ago. Since then, additional steps have been taken to ensure that passengers can't interfere with aircraft navigation systems, the vendors said.

All Our Latest News

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'The Google Channel'
Google fights the government over pornography, tries to make books available online, and maps Mars.

Larry Greenemeier With 'Token Effort'
RSA Security looks to implement token technology in common devices like cell phones, PDAs, and memory sticks.

Alex Wolfe With 'Video Made Handy'
Service providers and content providers all jump on the mobile video bandwagon.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Massaging Data
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A Week's Worth Of Dailies--All In One Place
Have you missed an issue or two of the InformationWeek Daily? Or want to check out some recent quotes of the day? Check out our Daily newsletter archive page and get caught up quickly.

-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

Microsoft: EU Refused Open Hearing Request (Associated Press)
Microsoft Corp. said Tuesday that the European Commission has refused its request for an open antitrust hearing later this month--hearings the EU said are never open to the public.

Broadband On The Range (USA Today)
Senate plans may spread high-speed service to rural spots.


5. In Depth: Technology And Your Health

Group Fingers Technology As Likely Cause Of Hearing Loss
The use of portable music players may be breeding habits that can lead to hearing loss, according to a survey done for the American Speech-Language-Hearing-Association.

Wearable Tech Is Alive And Well
Sensors in a body-hugging shirt send biometric data to health care professionals.

Canadian College Curbs Wi-Fi Due To Health Risks
The president of Lakehead University, in Thunder Bay, Ontario, is getting heated backlash from students and others who say his fears are overblown.

Wireless To Organize--And Maybe Save--Lives
Forget mobile music and video. Wireless may end up running your life, even offering the ability to automatically get a call when elderly relatives need help.

U.N. Targets Tobacco Advertising On Internet
Satellite television is also beaming cigarette ads into countries that have already banned the content in other venues, including network television and print, United Nations officials say.


6. Voice Of Authority

Rob Carter, FedEx CIO, Talks About The '6x6 Transformation'
Brian Gillooly recently spoke with FedEx CIO Rob Carter and asked him to outline a few of the major points he'll be delivering in his keynote presentation, "The Inside Story of FedEx's IT Platform Transformation," at the upcoming InformationWeek Spring Conference. Carter is InformationWeek's 2005 Chief of the Year.


7. White Papers

The Business Case For Layer-3 IP VPNs
As service providers have invested in the infrastructure required to deliver high-quality, network-based VPNs, business customers are increasingly using them for large portions of their data and voice traffic. While there are a number of ways enterprises can implement IP VPNs, this paper describes the advantages of a particular approach.


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