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6/13/2003
06:23 PM
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Letters To The Editor

Which Came First?
The paper trail appears to exist ("SCO Group Offers Peek Into Unix Source Code," June 9, p. 26). The problem is that we don't in fact know in which direction it goes--did the fugitive run to or from the advancing open-source movement?

Linux has the benefit of transparency. Its development is open, and we can see who added what and when just by reading through the various Internet-accessible kernel archives.

A mere comparison of specific lines of text between Unix SVR4, a closed-source operating system, and Linux, an open-source operating system, without knowing the development tree and history of the closed-source operating system is basically asking to be ripped off.
Wesley Parish
Christchurch, New Zealand



Health Care Speaks Up
I hope CEOs from the pure health-care environment attend the Microsoft event ("Miles To Go," June 2, p. 18).

These individuals and their boards deal with making multimillion-dollar decisions to purchase and implement change processes that support the delivery of patient care.

Such IT systems have a major impact in helping to reduce and eliminate medical errors, thus improving patient safety.
Constance Berg
Principal, Cardinal Health Consulting Group, San Francisco



Surfing The Cramped Skies
I was happy to read that Lufthansa and other airlines are moving ahead with "Interneting" the skies ("Lufthansa Passengers Surf The Friendly Skies," June 2, p. 26). But I wonder if it might be a success only in first class.

On the last three flights that I took (granted, not Lufthansa), the pitch between the rows was so small that I couldn't raise my PowerBook lid beyond about 60 degrees, not vertical enough to see what was on the screen. And that was with the seat in front of me upright; if the seat is reclined, the lid has nowhere to go.
Alex Podressoff
Senior Computer Analyst, SRP, Tempe, Ariz.



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