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8/15/2003
03:46 PM
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Letters To The Editor

Setting An Example
I respect that Herbert W. Lovelace put integrity as the first criterion when hiring people, not just personality, which can easily be faked, or skill, which can be learned ("Expense Cuts Put Everyone To The Test," Aug. 4, p. 104).

Thanks for setting an example for me to follow if I become a manager some day.
James Choi
International QA, Borland Software, Scotts Valley, Calif.



Spam Plan Would Backfire
The problem with anti–spam laws is that most spammers hide who they are or work outside the reach of the U.S. government ("No–Spam Registry Desired," July 28, p. 12).

A national do–not–spam list will do nothing but provide addresses to spammers. They'll hijack computers and servers and use them to send spam. They'll place their servers outside the reach of the government. People on the do–not–spam list will just get more spam.

The only thing that might slow the trend is making spam a felony with minimum jail time and fines for senders and fines for the people who hire spammers.
Richard Shetron
Troy, N.Y.



Investment Forsaken
Bob Evans misses the point completely ("Offshore Outsourcing: A Means To An End,"July 28, p. 78). Offshore outsourcing is the lack of innovation. Companies are turning to offshore out–sourcers because they can get better quality in shorter times at lower cost with a minimum of investment. The American worker is not inherently less quality conscious or slower than his or her offshore counterpart.

When a company chooses to go offshore, it has chosen not to invest in itself. It has transferred responsibility for quality and production to another entity. This is a short–sighted view. As this trend continues, our country loses jobs, buying power, and eventually its competitive edge.
Elias Lara
Applications Engineer, AZ Displays, Aliso Viejo, Calif.



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