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4/24/2004
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Letters To The Editor

Oversimplified View

Fred Langa brought up a good point about Linux's shortcoming ("Linux's Achilles' Heel," April 19, 2004). However, he oversimplified the issue. I don't believe a fair judgment can be made in favor of Windows by comparing Linux's inability to support one sound card.

Also, hardware compatibility is only one measure of an operating system. Security, robustness, reliability, and other attributes are equally important.

Ken DuCharme
Technical Analyst, J.P. Morgan Chase, Shrewsbury, Mass.


Linux: Good Outweighs Bad

I had sound problems with the built-in Intel chipsets, too. I now have four systems running on Fedora as it was the only one to get everything working.

What I like about Linux is that I have more control over my computer; it can include anything from office suites to tools for the Net to utilities for networking and the computer itself; and it's free.

Keith Budgen
Henrietta, N.Y.


Knowledge Is Security

The responsibility falls to manufacturers to make sure that every machine going out the door has a minimal firewall set up and running at all times ("Security Is Part Of All Our Lives," April 12, 2004). Moreover, add documentation explaining just how important it is to understand how data will be affected by not keeping security programs up to date.

Will this stem the tide of infections? Perhaps. Will it eliminate the problem? Never. As long as there are people writing viruses and clueless consumers, at best you can expect a draw.

Clint Scagliola
Scagliola Consulting, Penngrove, Calif.

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