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7/16/2004
06:36 PM
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Letters To The Editor

Wake-Up Call For Quality
Vendors have to recognize that poor security, high costs, and poor availability are all symptomatic of poor quality ("The Security Revolution: Coming Soon To A Vendor Near You," July 12, 2004). IT faces the same wake-up call about quality that manufacturing did in the '70s and '80s.

I'm concerned about the entire system--software, hardware, and services--as they must all bundle together correctly to deliver a product that's secure, reliable, and cost-effective. Vendors must shift from an artisan view to a process focus and truly embrace quality.

George Spafford Principal
Spafford Global Consulting, Saint Joseph, Mich.


Enlist Employees
While we can have sophisticated technology help fight the battle against the unscrupulous individuals who write malicious code, viruses, and worms, we cannot fight humans with technology alone ("Under Attack," July 5, 2004). The culprits who are bent on attacking systems have knowledge, and they seek out vulnerabilities to use them against the technology consumer.

Companies have to develop their "knowledge base" to counter these threats. This will call for equipping employees to be more cognizant of the threats and providing them with knowledge on how to thwart the threats. In addition, companies must ask employees: "If you were angry with the company, how would you infiltrate and destroy the information systems?" You'll be surprised how much you can learn.

Kevin Desouza Director
Institute for Engaged Business Research, Chicago


Job Training Isn't A Cure
Since March 2002, I've worked three months ("Bush Official Says Laws Aren't The Answer To Offshoring Concerns," June 23, 2004). I attended six months of training in Solaris, Oracle, C++, and Java, and I'm still having a problem finding a job.

All the training in the world is useless if there are no jobs.

Patrick Hagan
New York

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