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2/11/2005
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Letters To The Editor

Linux Challenges

One can measure the results of different development environments in a number of ways, such as lines of code, function points, and show-stopping bugs ("Torvalds And Linux Heavyweights Sound Off At Open-Source Summit," Feb. 1).

Many, including myself, wish to move to the Linux development mode but are limited by the reduced productivity of C-based languages. The Mono project is looming large as one key solution to this problem.

Use of patents as a weapon against Linux, however, is a very different and serious problem that may jeopardize the future security of the United States. Having a single system vendor (Microsoft) is a guarantee of extinction, as any student of genetics should be able to explain.

Robert W. Carter Senior System Developer
U.S. Army, Darnall Hospital
Fort Hood, Texas


Browser Watch

I develop Web sites and applications, and keeping tabs on browser market share is critical ("Browser Wars," Jan. 31). It tells us what customers are using and affects all development and testing because whatever technologies are used must be cross-checked between each browser's implementation.

Understanding market share tells you what browsers you need to internally test before considering an application ready for a production environment.

Ken Hekking Senior Systems Analyst
AvMed Health Plans
Gainesville, Fla.


Paper Trail

Just wondering why the Georgia court didn't go with document imaging and get rid of paper altogether ("Court Puts RFID On The Docket," Jan. 31)? Did it do a cost analysis between the two approaches? Seems to me that it's automating a problem instead of developing a viable solution. Unless, of course, Georgia doesn't recognize digital images as being legal.

Richard Staron Information Systems Manager
Hartford, Conn., Public Library

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