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3/25/2005
06:00 PM
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Letters To The Editor

MasterCard Responds

Your recent article "Gaining Strength From Sarbox" misstated MasterCard CFO Chris McWilton's assessment of a post-mortem of our Sarbanes-Oxley compliance (March 21). Mr. McWilton was quoted as saying we had "found poor documentation of financial controls that could have been automated, but weren't." In actuality, Mr. McWilton stated that we found inconsistent reporting that was being done by hand and could easily be automated for better consistency and efficiency.

Despite the cost and resource commitment required, MasterCard chose to voluntarily comply with Sarbanes-Oxley section 404 guidelines a full two years before the deadline for companies in our category because we strongly believe there's a very important benefit in demonstrating to our shareholders and customers that they can have confidence in our financial-reporting standards. MasterCard consistently works to leverage the changes mandated by the legislation with an eye on achieving greater efficiencies and improved operations at all levels of our organization.

Sharon Gamsin VP, Global Communications
MasterCard International


Internet Knows No Borders

What good will U.S. laws do in other countries ("Uncovering Spyware," March 21)? The Internet isn't American. Software isn't American. Most important, viruses, adware, and spyware aren't American. Unlike SARS, a physical virus that was contained for the most part in Asia, the Internet has no water to cross. Its only barrier is a data line.

I applaud you on researching this topic. However, the struggle ahead will undoubtedly prove to be an impossible one to overcome.

Steve Pagano
Roxbury, N.J.


Correction

In "Hurry Up: Filmmakers turn to blades for big project," C.O.R.E. Feature Animation used IBM's Director software (March 21).

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