Other
Commentary
2/21/2007
05:21 PM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Massive Insider Breach At DuPont

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Why Some U.S. Citizens Still Can't Get Broadband
2. Today's Top Story
    - Massive Insider Breach At DuPont
3. Breaking News
    - Vista Launch Week Sales Less Than XP
    - HP Offers New Integrity Servers, Operating System Upgrade
    - Google Earth Gets KML Search
    - Hackers Use New Zero-Day Word Exploit In Targeted Attack
    - Smokers Open The Door For Hackers ... Literally
    - MySpace Teen Suit Dismissed By Texas Court
    - Alliance Will Push Enterprise Adoption Of Open Source Code
    - Eli Lilly Recovers Confidential Documents But Loses Secrets To The Web
    - Data Center Energy Consumption Has Doubled Since 2000
    - Microsoft Adds Analytics To Its Dynamics CRM Software
    - Women Seeking Straight Men Flock To Sites Popular Among Women
    - Hacker Claims Progress In Decrypting High-Definition Movies
4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
    - Warner Music CEO Warns Wireless Industry The iPhone Could Win The Mobile Music Market
    - Paying Even More For Your Cell
    - Why My Deep-Seated Moral Principles Prevent Me From Putting Microsoft Office On My Mac
    - Google, Microsoft, And Dell Are Developing A Wireless Device?
5. White Papers
    - Eight Ways On-Site Service Can Generate Revenue
6. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
7. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." -- Philip K. Dick


1. Editor's Note: Why Some U.S. Citizens Still Can't Get Broadband

Over the past few decades, the citizens of these United States have had to become used to the fact that, when it comes to technology, we're falling behind. Our cars, TVs, phones, PCs, and other gadgets are more likely to come from an Asian or European factory than from a U.S. facility -- and let's not even talk about who's doing the tech support for our computers. Now it looks like we can't even keep up with Internet access.

According to a startling article by Richard Hoffman titled When It Comes To Broadband, U.S. Plays Follow The Leader, broadband coverage in the United States -- when measured by per capita penetration -- has fallen behind such countries as China, Iceland, Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Canada. If you live in a rural area, you're less likely to have access to broadband, and wherever you live, you're going to be paying more for it than your equivalent in other nations.

Why? Because large telecommunications companies want to invest their dollars where they'll get the most return on investment, so if you live in an area where it's not profitable to supply broadband, you're out of luck. And those who do live in a region where broadband is available will find that there's very little competition among suppliers -- in fact, most of us have a choice between a single DSL supplier and a single cable supplier. Now, this may not be an issue for, say, Verizon or Time Warner, but it does mean that the United States is falling behind other nations in making sure its citizens have access to the Internet.

I'm lucky. I live in an urban area where broadband connections are available and fairly reasonably priced. However, I know at least one writer who has had to deal with inconsistent satellite service for years because he lives in a rural area of the country. I've gotten e-mails from others who reported that their local governments were trying to find some way to get service to residents. (If they can -- according to Hoffman's article, lobbying by telecommunications companies can stop a state initiative in its tracks.)

In the middle of the 20th century, the telephone went from being a luxury item to a necessity. Today, a broadband connection to the Internet is making the same transition -- but the United States may not be ready for it.

Are you a victim of this type of selective broadband coverage? Does the fact that the United States is falling behind make you steamed? Or do you believe that this is a mountain built out of a molehill? Leave a comment at the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Barbara Krasnoff
bkrasnoff@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Massive Insider Breach At DuPont
A research chemist who worked for DuPont for 10 years before accepting a job with a competitor downloaded 22,000 sensitive documents and viewed 16,706 more in the company's electronic library.


3. Breaking News

Vista Launch Week Sales Less Than XP
An NPD Group report suggests Microsoft's gamble on its new operating system will help keep dollar volumes from dipping faster than the number of shrink-wrapped boxes sold.

HP Offers New Integrity Servers, Operating System Upgrade
Version 3 of HP-UX 11i has been enhanced for improved virtualization.

Google Earth Gets KML Search
A KML file can, for example, add data points to a Google Earth map of New Zealand that show where various scenes from the three Lord Of The Rings films were shot.

Hackers Use New Zero-Day Word Exploit In Targeted Attack
Hackers used the vulnerability, which was confirmed Wednesday, to launch an attack against two employees at the same company earlier this month.

Smokers Open The Door For Hackers ... Literally
One propped-open door to a smoking area can be a huge security risk for a company otherwise focused on battening down the network hatches.

MySpace Teen Suit Dismissed By Texas Court
A federal court dismissed a negligence lawsuit filed by the family of a teenage girl who was sexually assaulted by someone she met on the social networking site.

Alliance Will Push Enterprise Adoption Of Open Source Code
The alliance hopes to reduce the number of skills needed to bring open source code inside the enterprise and make it easier to deploy.

Eli Lilly Recovers Confidential Documents But Loses Secrets To The Web
The judge rejected Eli Lilly's request to ban Web sites from publishing the documents based on the difficulty of enforcing such an order.

Data Center Energy Consumption Has Doubled Since 2000
Worldwide, the electricity consumption for data center servers in 2005 was equivalent to 14 power plants, according to a new study.

Microsoft Adds Analytics To Its Dynamics CRM Software
The plug-in for Dynamics is part of Microsoft's grab at a multibillion-dollar BI industry.

Women Seeking Straight Men Flock To Sites Popular Among Women
Bad news, though. Web sites drawing the highest percentage of male visitors were those geared toward gay men.

Hacker Claims Progress In Decrypting High-Definition Movies
The hacker, who calls himself Arnezami, published his work Sunday on the Internet.


----- Featured Events -----

Managing A Windows Vista Migration
Microsoft has been working for several years on the next-generation Windows, and this effort has finally come to fruition. Will Vista warrant yet another massive Windows desktop migration? This free Interop Webcast will answer that.

VoiceCon Spring 2007: The Essential Conference On Enterprise Voice
Register now for the premier event for enterprise IP telephony, converged networks, and unified communications. VoiceCon Spring will be held March 5-8 at the Gaylord Palms in Orlando, Fla. Meet the industry's market and thought leaders during in-depth tutorials, candid roundtable discussions, and insightful panels. And the VoiceCon Exhibition presents all of the suppliers--equipment and services--in one location.

-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/mobile/

Warner Music CEO Warns Wireless Industry The iPhone Could Win The Mobile Music Market
Warner Music CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. walked into the 3GSM World Congress and pointed right at the pink elephant in the room: the iPhone. Bronfman warned the industry that if it cannot improve mobile music services, it could lose the market to Apple.

Paying Even More For Your Cell
According to an article in The New York Times, marketers have their eyes on our cell phones. Apparently, they say, it won't be long before we'll have to wait through a 15-second advertisement to check our e-mail or send a message.

Why My Deep-Seated Moral Principles Prevent Me From Putting Microsoft Office On My Mac
I decided the other day that I'm going to strive to avoid putting Microsoft Office on my new Mac. Like many users, I have a deep-seated moral principle preventing me from deploying this Microsoft product.

Google, Microsoft, And Dell Are Developing A Wireless Device?
According to a report from Bloomberg, Google is working with Microsoft, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and Philips to develop a prototype wireless device. The proposed device would, supposedly, use some variant of Wi-Fi. I'm not sure if this is the Google Phone or something else.


5. White Papers

Eight Ways On-Site Service Can Generate Revenue
Today, innovative service delivery models are creating new revenue opportunity for solution providers. This paper explores the tangible and immediate ways solution providers can leverage on-site service to expand their businesses, enter new markets, lower costs, and better serve customers.


6. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

Try InformationWeek's RSS Feed

Discover all InformationWeek's sites and newsletters

Recommend This Newsletter To A Friend
Do you have friends or colleagues who might enjoy this newsletter? Please forward it to them and point out the subscription page.


7. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

To unsubscribe from, subscribe to, or change your E-mail address for this newsletter, please visit the InformationWeek Subscription Center.

Note: To change your E-mail address, please subscribe your new address and unsubscribe your old one.

Keep Getting This Newsletter
Don't let future editions of InformationWeek Daily go missing. Take a moment to add the newsletter's address to your anti-spam white list:
InfoWeek@update.informationweek.com

If you're not sure how to do that, ask your administrator or ISP. Or check your anti-spam utility's documentation. Thanks.

We take your privacy very seriously. Please review our Privacy Policy.

InformationWeek Daily Newsletter
A free service of InformationWeek and the TechWeb Network.
Copyright (c) 2007 CMP Media LLC
600 Community Drive
Manhasset, N.Y. 11030

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July10, 2014
When selecting servers to support analytics, consider data center capacity, storage, and computational intensity.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join InformationWeek’s Lorna Garey and Mike Healey, president of Yeoman Technology Group, an engineering and research firm focused on maximizing technology investments, to discuss the right way to go digital.
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.