Comments
Sony Reveals 'Digital Paper' Tablet
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
AdrianDeBarros
50%
50%
AdrianDeBarros,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/1/2014 | 1:34:07 AM
I evangelized that Barnes and Noble should've pursued this avenue in the Summer of 2013...
Barnes and Noble should have moved away from the Nook tablet market and came out with an advance e-ink slatepad.  They could sell it for 199USD and take back market share from Amazon.  i spoke about this overview here:

http://www.tunnelyou.com/2013/06/idea-this-barnes-and-noble-slatepad.html
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 10:11:53 PM
Re: Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!

"Given its specs, what do you think is a more appropriate price?"

I've been wondering that. Given that it's "just" ePaper, it immediately (to me) needs to be cheap, because it's not a tablet replacement. As I say though, it's possible that the writing functionality is a game changer. Maybe price it similarly to a fruitPad and it may be more reasonable, and only because of its size. It's easier to put a high value on a multi-purpose device than one that seems quite so narrow focused.

 

Kristin Burnham
50%
50%
Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
3/31/2014 | 8:06:11 PM
Re: Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!
Given its specs, what do you think is a more appropriate price?
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 6:56:31 PM
Re: Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!
Wow, no kidding. Over $1000? Not a chance for me at least. In comparison, 9.7" Kindle DX: http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-DX-Wireless-Reader-3G-Global/dp/B002GYWHSQ, $199.

That's going to be a pretty hard sell, although the writing part is very cool. I think somebody produced one at one point perhaps, but I've said for a while that eInk (and similar) versus the regular LCD type screens are just too different, and devices picking either one over the other are making a compromise. Of course then, the ideal device perhaps is one with both screens available so you can read on the eInk, and play on the LCD. For that, I might pay $1000. Maybe.

So would I be interested in this if it were half the price? Maybe. It's still a tough sell. The handwriting has to be amazingly better than any other electronic writing surface I've used before. Sadly that won't be hard, but if it's as awful as writing on a glass screen, count me out.
anon8517537417
50%
50%
anon8517537417,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 6:16:41 PM
Re: Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!
Agreed. Price point is a pipe dream. I never have to freak out because a client dropped a piece of paper or dock an employee's pay for dropping a sheet of paper. This price point is laughable. I could get almost 2 galaxy note pro 12.2's for this price.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
3/31/2014 | 4:57:38 PM
Re: Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!
The cost is an issue, no doubt. $1,100 buys a lot of paper...
jgeiss4p
50%
50%
jgeiss4p,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 3:19:29 PM
Great idea... but too expensive to "change the world"!
I like the idea. I own a couple of Sony's eReaders, and they completely changed the way that I read books. If I can't get a digital copy of a novel, then I rarely read it anymore!

However, this is MUCH too expensive to change the way that people use paper. This device, at this size, for $99.00 would change the world. Even at $199.00, people would purchase one and try it out. Ideally, in an office environment, you would want several of them available on your desk, tossed around like we currently toss around clipboards and binders. But, at better than $1000.00 each?!? Not a chance.

The fact is that no company could justify getting them for all their employees. To really work, these things would almost have to be 'disposable'... so cheap that it would make more sense to replace a broken one than to worry about getting it fixed.

 
jeph4e
50%
50%
jeph4e,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 11:10:42 AM
Exactly What I'm Looking For
Backlit screens cannot replace paper. The old Tablet XP (i.e. Motion Computing circa 2004) used to wonders for note taking and document management.

I've been using Livescribe with great effect but would love to stop the paper use - so this looks like an option for me. Price is less important than functionality.

Looking forward to digital paper.
UberGoober
50%
50%
UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
3/31/2014 | 10:36:34 AM
Neither fish nor fowl
What an interesting and decidedly odd product.  I love the big, easy to read display and long batterylife, but hate the lack of a keyboard.  The article fails to cover what non-document functionality the device has, but unless it is far more powerful than the average e-reader, it just won't do enough to keep most users happy.  I might give up color for light weight, large screen, and wonderful battery life, but I couldn't give up web browsing, etc.;  in most environments, it wouldn't add enough utility to drag the thing around.  If it is generally an Android tablet with a big e-ink display, and if the outlandish price could be fixed, it might be a non-trivial niche player.


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 20, 2014
CIOs need people who know the ins and outs of cloud software stacks and security, and, most of all, can break through cultural resistance.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.