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Twitter Beats Facebook On Ad Returns
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/7/2014 | 4:23:14 PM
who wants clicks?
I continue to be amazed that online ad companies can sell a product that many advertisers don't really want: clicks. If you develop mobile apps, for example, you probably want installs more than clicks.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
4/8/2014 | 6:42:52 AM
Re: who wants clicks?
I think that's more to do with it being a more successful metric. If you sell ads based on installs, you're going to need to be pair a very high rate per install, as it's going to be a tiny percentage. However if you sell on clicks, you can bring the price right down and generate much more of a return for yourself as the platform holder.

Not saying it's more benefit to the advertiser, but it probably seems like a more attractive proposition.
A2ggour
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A2ggour,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/8/2014 | 12:44:58 PM
Re: who wants clicks?
Because clicks are theoretically in the control of the ad companies.  Their job, in essence, is to drive traffic somewhere.  Once someone clicks through and lands on whatever page they're supposed to, it's up to the page itself to convert the user.  

 

The problem is when ad companies mislead people with their ads to drive up clicks even though the message is not relevant to the outcome.  If I click on an ad that sets the expectation that I will be taken to a download page (or app store), your ocnversion rates should, in theory, go up, even if you get less clicks. BUT, if you're an ad company, you probably won't want your key metrics to be skewed because the landing page your directing traffic to, sucks.  
anon0934916276
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anon0934916276,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/8/2014 | 6:39:29 PM
Pretty amazed by this
Absolutely Kristin, thanks for the tips! I find your article extremely interesting actually. Matter of fact I was looking for Facebook ad ideas and I also found this pretty interesting. hope it help, goo.gl/LRoAtR  All the best.


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