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Kathleen Sebelius: Failed IT Project Manager?
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jcarlini601
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jcarlini601,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2014 | 1:52:56 PM
TOO MANY POSERS IN GOVERNMENT
I cannot believe some of the comments here.  She was the project executive.  If she did not have the skill sets of understanding the Systems Process for a major IT initiative, she should have had someone on her staff who had those skill sets.  For all the money a department gets within the Federal government, that department should have skilled IT people on staff.  Evidently, they didn't.  With this project being so critical, you would think they would want people who understood the compexity of this endeavor.  OR - maybe they thought IT projects are easy.  More evidence of people not knowing the complexities of IT and real-time systems.

 

ALSO- no one is questioning who the contractor was and what their qualifications were.  Was this a project thrown to a friend rather than a qualified contractor?  Better look at ALL the entities on this one, you might be surprised.

 

As to getting people back to work, this project should have been viewed as part of the Stimulus package and developed as a "keyboard-ready" project where they could have employed the 1000s of out-of-work IT professionals that were US citizens rather than throwing it to a foreign firm.  It could have been a positive jolt to our failing economy and maybe even had a better success story if done by Americans. 
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2014 | 12:20:11 PM
Re: Could you have done better than Kathleen Sebelius?
Good point, and that's one of the things I wonder about.  Another thing that occurs to me is that a couple of the things Mrs. Sibelius would have been expected to bring to the table given her experience as Governor of Kansas were the abilities to negotiate with the opposition, and to explain policy initiatives in terms that opposition voters can understand and might even accept (Kansas is a Republican state and has been since the Civil War).  I saw very little evidence of that in any aspect of the Obama Administration's health care reform initiative and it's the biggest reason why the ACA is still a highly partisan issue.  She should have been the Administration's principle spokesman on the issue from day one and actively involved in the effort to put a bill together.  Instead, the initiative seemed to have been run almost entirely from the White House (with little involvement from the most experienced politician present, Vice President Biden) and once the Republicans decided they didn't want anything to do with it, the focus was on getting enough Democrats behind it to allow it to pass on a party line vote.

 
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 11:25:11 AM
Re: Could you have done better than Kathleen Sebelius?
My comment could have been clearer: Sebelius was qualified to be head of HHS, but I don't think she was qualified to lead the healthcare.gov monster IT project. But that was part of the gig. It just should have been managed differently. I would love to know more details of her communication with Obama. If she pumped up the project with rosy reports to him, her resignation is more just. But if she tried to warn him and he waved it off, well....
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2014 | 10:51:51 AM
Re: Could you have done better than Kathleen Sebelius?
Two terms as governor of a state strikes me as good preparation to being a federal cabinet officer.  Both the political and the management skills acquired should be helpful in managing a large bureucracy like HHS (Mrs. Sibelius' executive background is much stronger than is President Obama's).  But it does appear that the whole project was badly managed and in the end, that suggests one of two people fell down on the job: the Secretary of HHS or the President that appointed her, was responsible for directing her, and to whom she was responsible.  And per the sign on the desks of Presidents Truman and Carter, the buck stops in the Oval Office.

 
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 10:33:17 AM
Re: Could I Have Done Better?
Given how many states had problems trying to field their own healthcare exchanges, I'm not sure a more decentralized approach would have been better. Nor would offering more incentives have been likely to make a difference for the states, some of whom had governors and legislatures making the decision on partisan grounds. I wouldn't be surprised if some state IT directors also saw this project coming and set off alarms over schedule, budget, and complexity.

In full arm chair quarterback mode, I've been thinking it might have been better to centralize efforts on one website (or one common codebase for the core system) and work like hell to get it right.

You also suggest having the insurance companies build the exchanges. I'm not sure how that would have worked. There were, however, some private health insurance exchanges that might have served as a model or even licensed code to the effort. The relatively successful California state exchange was built partly on code licensed from a firm called GetInsured (see GetInsured Wants To Be Cloud Provider To State Exchanges).
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 10:29:21 AM
Re: Could you have done better than Kathleen Sebelius?
I can't help but feel that Sebelius is a scapegoat, and got in over her head in a beauracratic position for which she was not qualified. It sounds like communication up the chain of command was terrible, and that's on her. But Obama put a politician in charge of the construction of a really, really important website and it became a quagmire early on. That's on the president.

Like other commenters have written, HHS should have partnered with an experienced solution provider from the beginning.
BruceB093
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BruceB093,
User Rank: Strategist
4/14/2014 | 9:55:01 AM
Re: She's a politician, not a techie, but...
Not a techie, but most senior managers have managed projects (she was an insurance commissioner and then governor for 2 terms) and should have the ability to detect and assess when she is getting good and bad information.  

Again, this only works well when the senior manager has had successful projects -- which is hard to come by in government.  She recently said: "Clearly, the estimate that it was ready to go Oct. 1 was just flat-out wrong. ... If I had a magic wand and could go back to mid-September and ask different questions based on what I know now."

Mid-September?  That is only about two weeks before the launch.  The only thing someone can generally do just 2 weeks before a major deadline is to delay the deadline.  If a senior manager is unaware that they have a bad project and it is two weeks from deadline, then they either probably have no clue (she seems a lot smarter than that) or else they've been ignoring all the bad evidence and been just listening to what they wanted to hear -- which in my experience is fairly common.

Most projects that don't deliver on time and are buggy, again in my experience, will clearly show critical problems before half the schedule has passed.  Intermediate milestones are missed and quality measures are way behind (functionality working, defect counts, etc.).  Few mega-projects suddenly fail just two weeks before the final deadline.

Actually, the evidence that it may be working (at least as to signing up) is heartening, suggesting that it might be actually useful one day. Three to six months late is not too bad even by corporate standards (which is a sad state of affairs).  It could have gone the way of the FBI's Virtual Case File where we are out over $100 million with not much to show for it. 

 
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2014 | 8:50:58 AM
Could I Have Done Better?
I probably could have raised awareness regarding some of the site's architecture.  From the beginning, it seems the site was tasked with a massive set of requirements that were trying to be fulfilled in real/near real time which, in my opinion, was a huge red flag.  However, I seriously doubt whether or not such advice would have made any difference.

The problem with this task is it was wrong-headed from the very start. That is, bad initial decisions were made regarding the single fed exchange.  The fed never should have tried to create a single exchange for all the states that didn't want to create their own.  Once it became obvious a lot of states were going to opt out of creating their own exchange, they should have figured out a way to incent most/all of those states to build their own.  Granted, this might have higher initial costs but when this started we were in the midst of the worst-ever recession.  Although I'm sure there would have still been a few hold-outs, the right financial incentives would have convinced most that the potential economic stimulus is more important than their principles.

I also agree with another post regarding why the government wanted this at all.  The government should have told the insurance companies they need exchanges and, again, incented them to build them rather than a single, massive and failed fed site.
satneosen900
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satneosen900,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/13/2014 | 4:06:02 PM
Re: Could you have done better than Kathleen Sebelius?
'Completely agree that the failure of healthcare.gov was attributable to a failure if leadership and Sebalius should own up and seek a better fit. But the other clear failure was Obama's. I'm always confounded by poor operators who blame their underlings for what they are responsible to deliver. Any good operator/manager would have been able to deliver - especially with the resources that were available. Any other explanation is simply politics.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
4/12/2014 | 3:52:25 PM
She's a politician, not a techie, but...
...as an ex-governor she does or should have understood that an executive is responsible for what her people do and don't do, even if it's outside of her area of expertise.  It was her job to make it work and she and her President are responsible for the successes and failures of implementation (the President and Congress are responsible for the law itself).

 
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