Comments
Hacker Weev Free After Appeal
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hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Moderator
4/14/2014 | 7:16:56 PM
Re: ATT failed
We all know his intention was (fame) at others' casualties.

He's still responsible for it. He can't give the list to somebody else and has that third party post the list and claimed 'I didn't do it'. Ofcourse he knew the website is going to publish that list.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 3:43:30 PM
Re: ATT failed
>He can't post private stuff on the internet without permission. People can sue him for $.
 
 I don't believe he did. He allegedly provided the data to Gawker, which published redacted portions.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Moderator
4/14/2014 | 3:04:43 PM
ATT failed
Clearly when they(ATT) didn't do "black box testing". They have to 'catch' bad inputs in their codes. It's ATT responsiblity.

The court got it right, Weev didn't hack. He didn't illegally access any system. He entered bad inputs and got outputs. There was no illegal activity.

However, He's irresponsible. He can't post private stuff on the internet without permission. People can sue him for $.
InsideStoryBook
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InsideStoryBook,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2014 | 2:05:28 AM
Weev is a raving anti-semite
I felt a kinship with this guy considering I fought the Feds on ridiculous charges and wound up with a 30 month sentence. Those feelings quickly vanished when I learned on Twitter he believes the Jews are responsible for 9/11, Heartbleed and made up the Holocaust.

If you want to know the truth about our "justice" system and the pathetic state of our prisons go to www-inside-story-book.com
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
4/12/2014 | 3:41:42 PM
Re: Heartbleed coincidence
This has a lot to do with how this data was leaked. I'm sure that being exposed on Gawker was a PR nightmare for AT&T in this instance. This guy obviously found a hole that could cause the comapny a lot of problems, and the issue at hand could have been exploited in some pretty bad ways. 

Security researchers are doing good things, I just don't think that organziations like to see data exposed in subversive ways. There needs to be some protections, however, for sure. 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:12:41 PM
Re: Heartbleed coincidence
Security researchers do fear being prosecuted in some instances. It's a real problem. The law needs to be clear so that people don't have to be afraid of prosecutorial overreach. 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:07:15 PM
Re: convicted?
That should be "charged" not "convicted." Fixed now.
coding123
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coding123,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/11/2014 | 4:52:25 PM
Heartbleed coincidence
I find it interesting that in a lot of these "HACKER" labelings it seems almost as if there are people in authoritative positions that have control over (or are part of) law enforcement are simply "hating on" certain individuals simply because of how they look.

 

If you think about it, this case is not dissimilar to the heartbleed issue. Should we now prosecute the researchers from Google that revealed heartbleed? Wouldn't that be the fair thing to do?

They say that law/justice is blind - but it actually isn't because people decide to implement it WHEN they want. If we enacted every law on the books for everyone equally - we'd all be in prison (even the people in the government).
anon7694469560
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anon7694469560,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/11/2014 | 4:26:53 PM
convicted?
was aaron schwartz "convincted," or merely charged with the statute used to convict this "weev" gentleman?


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