Comments
Twitter Posts Betray Illness
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 4:56:54 PM
Tipoffs?
Did the researchers share any sample Twitter post tipoffs that you had the flu? Was it people saying they were tired, for instance, or was it that someone's typical Twitter volume went down?
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 5:02:09 PM
Re: Tipoffs?
Not really. It was a combination of keyword analysis and other data.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
4/14/2014 | 5:41:33 PM
Crowd awareness corrupts social net analysis
My diagnosis: Crowd awareness of Google Flu Trends leads to trend results corruption. If you have the flu and know Google is watching your searches, you may modify your key word choices to maintain a little privacy.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 3:04:03 AM
Re: Tipoffs?
Laurianne, 

You don't have to be a data scientist to read my tweets from last week and conclude that I had a flu. Between the text analysis of my own tweets and the replies I got it was pretty obvious. 

Penn University should occupy its data scientists in something more productive. 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 3:07:11 AM
Re: Tipoffs?
Thomas, 

"After discarding the data of a handful of individuals for a variety of reasons, the researchers set out to analyze the tweets from both groups in their study to determine whether they could diagnose influenza from Twitter posts."

In other words, they discarded the individuals who hadn't given any clue about their flu in their tweets. :D

-Susan
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 7:09:32 AM
Accuracy
Considering there is absolutely no way to verify any of the information collected this way, without somehow having access to that person's medical records AND they would have had to had visited a medical professional to confirm it themselves, this seems like an entirely redudant exercise. 
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 9:54:35 AM
Re: Tipoffs?
>In other words, they discarded the individuals who hadn't given any clue about their flu in their tweets. :D

Actually, they dropped individuals who, for example, didn't have Twitter accounts.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 10:19:11 AM
Re: Tipoffs?
Thomas, 

"Actually, they dropped individuals who, for example, didn't have Twitter accounts."

Well, of course. There is no point in analyzing tweets of non-existing accounts. Yet, the whole thing doesn't make too much sense to me. 

Do you believe this research is accurate, or useful in any way? 

-Susan
Kristin Burnham
50%
50%
Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 2:31:09 PM
Re: Accuracy
I agree, Whoopty. (Plus, the last thing on my mind when I have the flu is tweeting about it.)


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Nov. 10, 2014
Just 30% of respondents to our new survey say their companies are very or extremely effective at identifying critical data and analyzing it to make decisions, down from 42% in 2013. What gives?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.