Comments
Could Insurance Cover Your Next Fitness Band?
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Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 3:48:49 PM
Re: Insurance companies should pay - but will they demand to see data?
If that's the case, I'll buy the damn fitband myself. My body, my data. The only people I'd want to see my activity data would be my trainer (if I had one) and my doctor.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 2:52:56 PM
Re: Insurance companies should pay - but will they demand to see data?
Once the health insurer buys the device, the insurer gets to track how many steps you take each day. There is a penalty possibility of course.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 2:26:26 PM
Re: Insurance companies should pay - but will they demand to see data?
I wonder which people would prefer: Pay the $100 themselves for the device and keep their data private, or recoup the price in exchange for sharing their data with insurance companies (if that's what it came down to). Thoughts?
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 11:31:34 AM
Insurance companies should pay - but will they demand to see data?
Health insurance companies should step up and at least cover the costs of activity wristbands (around $100). It's an investment in the future that will pay off in healthier customers. The data point in this story I found most surprising (and encouraging) is that of 300,000 patients surveyed, 63% of those using who monitored their health and exercise via smartphone were overweight or obese. Shows that health wearables and apps are not exclusively for already-healthy fitness enthusiasts. Insurance companies should take note.

Where this gets tricky is if insurance companies ask to monitor the data generated by the apps/wristbands to justify their investment (they did, after all, pay for the damn things). Opens up a can of privacy issue worms.

 

 


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