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Inside Kayak's Search For Seasoned IT Talent
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 11:51:06 AM
Your reaction?
Here is one company's perspective on the much-debated IT talent shortage. On the flip side, many IT pros maintain a shortage doesn't exist, that some HR departments are too picky and others simply don't want to pay veteran salaries. Readers, are you surprised he can't fill 12 slots in the talent-rich pool of people in the greater Boston area?
bglynn064
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bglynn064,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/16/2014 | 11:37:27 AM
Re: Your reaction?
here's a suggestion. like all idiot industries stop requiring "prior travel site experience". technology doesnt know what industry its being used in
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 12:04:29 PM
Telework?
So by this: "his preference is to hire in Boston, but if the company can't find the right people eligible to work there, its German office will grow." 

I take it to mean, you work in a physical office. People who live in Chicago and want to work remotely need not apply? 

Concord and the surrounding areas are insanely expensive. Maybe that plays a part.
lastoneout
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lastoneout,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 2:15:49 PM
Re: Telework?
just fyi on concord pricing.  anything along rt2 or rt 3 out to 495 is over priced.  2 bedroom, 1000sqft apt is about $2500 in most of boston, $1800-$2000 in waltham, newton, woburn, $1200-$1500 in acton and $1000-$1200 in ayre.  I've been looking.  It is almost worth the 1.5hr commute to live in a more rural environment


to your point of telecommuting, rent/property prices will drive telecommuting, not environmental concerns. if your workers can't afford to live near to work, you need to find another way to make it possible for people to work with you.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 2:45:18 PM
Re: Telework?
I grew up in the area, so believe me, I hear you on costs. The commute to Concord from just about anywhere is terrible as well.

It's a beautiful and historic city with a great downtown, so I get why you'd want to base your company there. But public transportation options are very limited, and I lack sympathy for companies that say they want the very best people for the job ... but only if they happen to live nearby or are willing to uproot their families or endure hours in the car.

Yahoo seems to have started the pendulum swinging back to demanding that IT professionals put in face time. Whether that's good or bad depends, I suppose.
lastoneout
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lastoneout,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 3:00:04 PM
Re: Telework?
this could be a fun conversation. :-)

I'm not impressed by any downtown. concord is nothing but expensive small shops for tourists.  locals generally go leave the town to spend most of their money.


yes, the commute sucks. all of the roads are jammed because of overflow from rt 2.

pubtran is better off absent than inadequate because if you have a broken pubtran system, it suck up resources and rationalization kicks in to justify the wasted time and expense. If you have nothing, you can at least figure out what's really needed and then make the case for spending the money. In small cities like Concord, the solution is probably going to be banning private cars in the city center and only allowing robot electric cars for on-demand transportation.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 3:36:55 PM
Re: Telework?
I kinda like downtown Concord, but that's not the point. Complaining about not being able to hire very specific talent in a very costly geographic region, is. 

Banning cars won't fly even in Massachusetts!
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 4:09:22 PM
Re: Telework?
Telecommuting has its pros and cons depending on the group's culture. I have heard several CIOs tell me that they must be within reach of public transportation in the Boston area in order to attract and retain developers. However, I also know CIOs who recruit talent to out of the way locales like Springfield MA. Anyone have advice to share for hiring managers outside of city centers?
factchecker2000
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factchecker2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/16/2014 | 5:52:16 AM
Karma is a ....
This guy has a talent shortage all right, but it's in his HR department. He says he wants seasoned talent and boasts a game room? Something's not right here. And seasoned talent is not what you get from India. Creative writing (their resumes) is more like it. Does he offer telecommuting? He can go to the ends of the earth, but he doesn't want to expand his local range by offering telecommuting? Sounds fishy to me. I wouldn't buy stock in this company, or any company that invests in H-1Bs.

Over the past 15 years, literally hundreds of thousands of American IT careers were destroyed by bringing in H-1Bs and by sending jobs overseas. I run into ex-IT Americans everywhere. The man who measured my son for his graduation suit, the husband of a coworker who now works in a bicycle shop, a woman at a craft fair ...

So we kick a large percentage of Americans out of the IT field, to the point where parents like me are telling their kids to be good with computers but major in something else, and this guy wonders why he can't find talent?

The answer is simple. He should pick gifted Americans who have most of what he wants and let them grow in the job. The only thing "seasoned" about an H-1B is their brown-bag lunch.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
4/16/2014 | 11:09:19 AM
Re: Karma is a ....
The CTO clearly said that he's considering H-1Bs among the pool of fresh graduates Kayak is interviewing, not for the seasoned talent it's going after. 
VinceN487
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VinceN487,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/16/2014 | 11:49:39 AM
Re: Karma is a ....
H1B's are only supposed to be brought over here for seasoned and highly experienced roles, where you can't find local candidates - legally.  By  hiring H1B's for entry level/low experience roles, the CTO is openly admitting to breaking the law.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
4/16/2014 | 12:47:35 PM
Re: Karma is a ....
I'm neither a proponent nor a critic of H-1B visas -- employers will do what's in their own interests -- but the program isn't reserved specifically for seasoned and highly experienced roles. And in fairness to the Kayak CTO, he isn't saying it's H-1B or bust. He sees the program as just one of the options at his disposal.
factchecker2000
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factchecker2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/19/2014 | 6:29:37 AM
Re: Karma is a ....
So, you're neither a proponent nor a critic of H-1B visas? Why not? Does that mean you think there might be some reason that makes this ok? http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9247744/H_1B_loophole_may_help_California_utility_offshore_IT_jobs_
KevinRCasey
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KevinRCasey,
User Rank: Moderator
4/16/2014 | 10:01:23 PM
Re: Karma is a ....
Like Rob, I'm neither a proponent nor critic of H-1Bs. Rather, I just see it as a relevant topic for the IT community. But I think there are a couple of misconceptions below, one of which I covered in a previous story (http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/team-building-and-staffing/h-1b-visas-6-most-misunderstood-facts/d/d-id/898928). First, there's no rule in the H-1B process that employers must show they're unable to hire for the position(s) locally/domestically before applying for visas on the behalf of employees. (That's true of green cards, not H-1Bs.) Second, experience isn't really one of the key requirements for H-1B eligibility. Rather, the visas are for "specialty occupations" (including non-IT roles, like fashion models) requiring very specific skill sets. Certainly, experience is one way to develop those skills -- and something that plenty of employers are looking for. But education/degree is the more clear-cut factor for H-1B eligibility: http://www.uscis.gov/eir/visa-guide/h-1b-specialty-occupation/understanding-h-1b-requirements
rrdonovan
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rrdonovan,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/18/2014 | 4:27:31 PM
Re: Karma is a ....
Looking for talent huh? Well, I am a Technologist with 100+ hrs on my PhD., 16 technical schools, and 35 years experience in electronics, electromechanics, and computer systems. When interviewed, it is usually by some snot nosed 26 year old who wants to give me tests, or wants me to eleaborate on the 7 networking layers, or says that I am not qualified to do what I have done for 35 years. They prefer to hire boy toys, or girl toys. That's why the recreation room. No work ethics, no class, Why would I, a seasoned veteran want to work for a bunch of stupid, no talent kids?

 

Master Rod
VinceN487
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VinceN487,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/16/2014 | 11:47:26 AM
No More H1b's
what makes stupid employers think that they can just bring anyone over here to work, becasue they think they are offering a "good deal"..?..where did they get these crazy ideas.  Kayak can't find who they want, but somehow india is full of all the right fake-resume'd H1B's to make these right, what a bunch of b/s that is.  That's not how our society works, and H1B was never intended as a vehicle to replace American workers on American soil.  There are all  kinds of options available to an H1B-lovin' employer, but none of them include bringing over H1B and L1 job robbers for the purposes of wrecking our economy. And if the intentions and motivations are sincere, then blame your canundrum on previous H1B users who've complete raped the system for the last 15 years, you can thank those who've come before you for spoiling the H1B party.  No sympathy for H1B abusers, H1B needs to end right now


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