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Google Glass: 5 Reasons I Won't Buy
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SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
4/16/2014 | 8:57:59 AM
Re: Google Glass - Five Reasons i Won't Buy
I would like to have a Glass like product just for the HUD, if I could pair a device with my phone though and get the display on a Glass like display I'd be happy.  The natural question would be "why" but if you've ever spent time looking down at a smart phone screen trying to do things via RDP, squinted at a display washed out by the sun or tap out a very long message you will appreciate being able to keep your head up without your phone held a face level.  I don't think I would ever record my day or snap pictures as I walked around but I would love a display that would keep me from becoming part of the phone zombie apocalypse.
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
4/16/2014 | 8:33:08 AM
Re: There is potential!
There is already a much more affordable tool out there for your needs -

The ReconJet is way cool. I saw a banner ad for it months ago and it gives exactly what you are talking about at half of the price of Glass. Plus, it is already configured for what you need it for.

http://www.reconinstruments.com/products/jet/
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 7:38:10 PM
Reason #6
There is no real need for Google Glass. I cannot think of a single moment in my already rather long (tech) life where I thought "Hmmmmm...if my glasses could shoot pictures and video and interact with my smartphone, that would be great right now!" Likewise, other than making phone calls and potentially checking email I see no purpose for smartphones other than that some companies get stinkin' rich. Both are nothing but an expensive toy.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 7:18:52 PM
Re: Google Glass - Five Reasons i Won't Buy
Segway is an apt comparison in terms of hype. And like a Segway, Glass will be useful in certain limited circumstances. I'm more and more convinced that Google's decision to make Glass a general purpose Android device is the primary problem. A general purpose computer is useful when you're working at your desk and you want to switch between different applications. With Glass, as with a mobile phone, I may want some functions some times, but I don't need to wear it to have those functions accessible all the time. Glass is like mounting your cellphone on your ear so you can use it any time. Is that really desirable?

One common scenario Google depicts is driving with Glass. Sergey Brin did so early on and posted a picture on Google+. But think about driving on a long trip with Glass. It would probably go unused most of the time. Is the opportunity to get a picture or two worth wearing Glass the whole time? Is Glass better than a GoPro on the dashboard or a mobile you could use when you stopped the car or a passenger who could take pictures for you?

Google, like Facebook, has this assumption that people have to capture images, email, and record things 24/7. But I don't think most people want to do that. And those who do are not really people you want to be around. Frankly, a mobile phone does most of what Glass can do for less, less conspiciously.
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
4/15/2014 | 6:16:51 PM
Re: Google Glass - Five Reasons i Won't Buy
I'm not a Google Glass fan, but I don't think the Segway comparison is fair. The Internet is incredibly useful as a general tool, and I'm sure there are going to be lots of applications for the hands-free access that Glass enables. By contrast, the Segway is an appliance--a single-purpose device--which limits its utility. Also, it's impossible not to look like a dork on a Segway. If Google Glass gets popular, I'm sure designers will find ways to make them look cooler.
O'DoyleRules
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O'DoyleRules,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 4:55:37 PM
Whatever
Look at this thing. In a few years, it will seem like the calculators we paid $3,000 for in 1973. I think implantable contact lenses (which were science fiction 10 years ago but on the verge of reality today) are the way to go. And personally, I see this apparatus (along with "smart wristwatches") as something already past its prime and something with a solution searching for a problem. Sort of like 3D-TVs. What can this thing do that my "smart telephone" can't do?
HeatherL524
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HeatherL524,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 4:18:55 PM
Re: Camera pointing at me?
That is an excellent idea!  Only the red-light should beam straight center of what the camera is aiming at.  LOL
HeatherL524
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HeatherL524,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 4:16:54 PM
Great article!
You made so many great points and wow, I didn't realize the smartwatches were so affordable.  I couldn't agree with you more on the nerdiness aspect.  Shared this.  Thanks for that enjoyable read.
anon9473355920
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anon9473355920,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2014 | 3:25:52 PM
Camera pointing at me?
So you're talking to someone, wearing these 'glasses'... really a mini Gopro camera pointing at you with no indication its on or not...

Wondering what the polite way to address this is?  "Would you mind taking that camera off me?"

"It's not on, they're my Google Glass"

"Well, it feels like a camera is pointed at me, would you mind not using them while talking with me, its awkward"

Unless you're from NYC... this whole thing is just a little confronting and uncomfortable.  I think some sort of privacy law should be in place... like a little red light indicating its on.

 

 
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
4/15/2014 | 3:19:57 PM
Re: There is potential!
Glass is still in the womb -- so to speak. But I agree with ChuckS781, there are many situations both work (police, doctors, journalists, manufacturing) and play (mostly athletes from cyclists to golfers) where accessing or recording information hands-free will be beneficial. Most folks don't need or even want Google Glass now. But give it five years. Convenience and unique features are powerful forces. Did you ever think as you snapped your flip phone shut in in 2006 that you'd soon be using a touch-screen smartphone to identify a song playing, watch a movie and/or tell you how many calories you burned while jogging? Glass and other wearables are just the next wave. However, I really hope people don't wear smartglasses all the time. I pray for "as needed" use. Moderation, please. 
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