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SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
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Guest,
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12/15/2011 | 8:52:20 PM
re: SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
Yes, these cloud/SaaS applications can be a hassle to integrate with on-premise applications. I wonder if SAP will integrate SF into NetWeaver.

This is the best option, IMO. Cast Iron, now part of WebSphere, is an ESB is designed to integrated "cloud" applications (hooks built in for SF, SFDC, Workday, etc) with other open API applications, like SAP HCM. The orchestrations are really slick. It is a little transaction volume sensitive, you can choke it, but it shouldn't be an issue if you are just running a point to point between SF and SAP.

http://drupal1.castiron.com/in...
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12/15/2011 | 8:27:05 PM
re: SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
I hear you... there are definitely scenarios where extremely fast read/writes will be beneficial, but they are pretty rare. For the average SAP user, that is running say AR, AP, GL, PP, MM, HR, SCM, what does improving the response time from 2 seconds to .2 seconds do for them?... not much. SAP tends to be back-office applications where response time is not that critical, not front-office applications like store fronts.... It would definitely be cool from a technology perspective, but I don't understand the ROI.

This will also introduce a whole new layer of complexity unless you want to make HANA your master database to replace Oracle/DB2 for every application, not just ERP.... If you use HANA for SAP, you will need some sort of costly MDM solution to aggregate and synchronize all of the tables for other applications that use, for instance, your master customer tables.... I think in-memory, for the vast majority of users, is still a solution in search of a problem. Particularly when you are talking about using in-memory for OLTP (several TBs of data) as opposed to say OLAP (several GB of data). I wish SAP would have just stuck with DB2 as their preferred DB and Oracle if users want it. This is going to get messy.
The Alchemist
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The Alchemist,
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12/15/2011 | 9:07:18 AM
re: SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
Well, an in-memory database in itself would not justify the big bucks. But when you start digging deeper into the potential for applications that run on current RDMS - thats when the value of in-memory databases begin to emerge. Take for example, if its possible to crunch huge amount of backend data in transactional databases and return the result at sub-second speeds, think of what can be achieved. An actual example would be to analyze the profile of an online shopper, credit history, demographic information, social trends via newsfeeds etc. (all huge amount of data) and based on this info, return a dynamically calculated discount for the online shopper. Thats where the value of in-memory databases comes in. SAP's vision is to have eventually its ERP running on the in-memory database (HANA) and now you should picture all those time consuming transactions working extremely fast. You can even imagine how his could affect the supply chains, planning simulations etc ... which traditionally involve huge data crunching.
The Alchemist
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The Alchemist,
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12/15/2011 | 9:06:51 AM
re: SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
It would be good to know the scenarios where on premise HCM can work with cloud based SuccessFactors.
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12/15/2011 | 8:19:47 AM
re: SAP: We'll Be No. 2 Database Player By 2015
Hmmm, it looks like SAP is attempting to follow Oracle and expand their stack. This will be very interesting for SAP users that run on Oracle or DB2 today.

HANA is an in-memory database. In-memory databases tend to run... in-memory. I can see running in-memory as an accelerator or possibly for BI, if for some reason users need their reports in sub-second speeds (I am not really sure what that does for you), but why would you want to pay the millions of hardware dollars it would cost to run an entire transactional database in-memory? Disk is cheap, flash is expensive.


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