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Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
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Bprince
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Bprince,
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12/18/2011 | 6:12:08 PM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
Interesting story. I wonder sometimes if the FAA doesn't try to err on the side of caution, which for example would explain why all electronic devices have to get turned off on an airplane before landing (such as my iPod).
Brian Prince, InformationWeek/Dark Reading Comment Moderator
TheMoMan
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TheMoMan,
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12/16/2011 | 3:22:01 PM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
No one is saying that LightSquared cannot use their satellite. Just that the definition of an ancillary network does not mean putting up a repeater on every one of Sprints towers. Thereby drowning out the signals from the military GPS birds. The signals from those towers would be too strong for Onstar, SiriusFX,Timing signals to railroads,TV Stations, 911 call centers to work. Also the FAA has a lot more money from the airline industry invested in its ground avoidance system. That Satellite you speak of is almost a decade old, Now LightSquared wants to use that Satellites frequencies for ground to ground not SPACE to GROUND.
Dwayne Bozworth
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Dwayne Bozworth,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/16/2011 | 12:36:39 AM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
Hi and thanks, Tom!
Tom LaSusa
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Tom LaSusa,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2011 | 8:37:19 PM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
hi Dwayne,

No, it wasn't deleted. Our policy is to pre-screen any posts that include an outside link, so as to curtail the amount of spam that crops up on the site. Once we check the link, the comment gets pushed live...as you can see it was :)

Best
Tom LaSusa
InformationWeek Community Manager
Dwayne Bozworth
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Dwayne Bozworth,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2011 | 8:27:56 PM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
Hmm. Seems my last comment was deleted.

Maybe the FAA needs to pay for a replacement satellite or updated navigation equipment due to lax Quality Control Standards. Either way, rocket scientists were involved, and now it seems like someone is being paid off to ensure the satellite can't be used as intended.

Maybe it was AT&T who is paying people off, and keeping the satellite from being used... They seem to have a lot of money set aside for political reasons.

Either way, we need more educated pilots, like Chesley Sullenberger, who bravely flew an Airbus into the Hudson River safely, without GPS..! There were no casualties
Dwayne Bozworth
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Dwayne Bozworth,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/15/2011 | 8:15:00 PM
re: Lightsquared Disrupts Airplane Navigation GPS, Feds Say
Who approved the spectrum, and applied Quality Assurance for existing equipment??

It takes a lot of capital investment and smart rocket scientists to get a satellite in orbit, then someone says it can't be used? What the hell!

Perhaps someone at the FCC is at fault, or maybe it's the lax approvals and quality-assurance metrics at the FAA. Either way, a satellite was paid for, launched, put into orbit, and now someone says it can't be used?

Someone's head is going to be on a platter, because if the FCC allowed the spectrum to be used, and the FAA says it can't work, well, I guess the FAA should pay full replacement costs for something that works which may mean new navigation equipment, or a new satellite placed into orbit which works with things within the FAA's area of "expertise".

Besides, why can't we just go back to hiring good airplane pilots who know how to fly a plane? Does everything have to be controlled by robots and computers? Captain Sullenberger didn't need GPS to safely fly a plane into the Hudson River. We need more educated workforce, including airline pilots like Sully. I guess airlines are so cheap that they'd rather make up stories than paying airplane pilots what they are worth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...


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