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10 Hadoop Hardware Leaders
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JimBot
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JimBot,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 6:14:55 PM
Re: X86 has a lock... for now
Very interested in IBM's move into this space.  Agree with the premise that Hadoop designed to scale out...be very interesting to see how well that premise holds up as the market matures, scale increases and total costs (not just acquistion costs) become better known. How easily the x86 Hadoop ecosytem moves and/or ports to Power8 is huge (so far) unknown.
PSSCLabs
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PSSCLabs,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2014 | 10:47:09 AM
PSSC Labs Should Be Included On This List
PSSC Labs is developing unique Big Data server platforms engineered specifically for Hadoop.  The company offers the world's only Enterprise ready 1U server supporting 48TBs of storage.  This revolutinary product, the CloudOOP 12000, is compatible with leading Hadoop distributions including MapR, Cloudera and Hortonworks.  The CloudOOP 12000 is already deployed in many production environments for all sorts of industry verticals.  In fact, MapR itself is deploying 50 of these units for their own internal development cluster.  

An added benefit of this unique platform is energy efficiency. Most configurations consume less than 250 Watts at load.  That is almost half the power draw of every other company on this list.  

PSSC Labs offers complete, turn-key, ready to run Hadoop Cluster with its' CloudRax platform.   CloudRax supports nearly 2 PBytes in a single 42U rack.   

For more information visit www.pssclabs.com

 

 
bitrefinery
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bitrefinery,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/25/2014 | 7:38:26 PM
Re: You're probably not looking at hardware if you're thinking cloud
Actually, we have customers coming to us because we supply the dedicated hardware on private clusters. Most of them don't want to make the investment in the hardware especially for a newer technology like this. Makes sense for them. AWS is great for spinning up nodes once a day and running calculations vs. a 24/7 cluster. Fun stuff.

- Eric, Bit Refinery
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
4/24/2014 | 1:03:34 PM
You're probably not looking at hardware if you're thinking cloud
I agree it would be interesting to look at cloud deployment options for Hadoop, but that belongs in a separate collection without the word "hardware" attached. Cloud capacity is undoubtedly the hands-down winner where price-for-performance and Hadoop are concerned. Few if any enterprises can buy, provision, and run at Amazon or even Rackspace or IBM SoftLayer economies of scale.

If you're looking at hardware, I'd submit it's not because you think you can achieve a lower TCO than renting virtual racks from AWS. You're choosing to deploy on premises because that's where your organization wants to keep its data (for security, regulatory or other reasons) and it has the people and data-center capacity to explore the opportunity. Maybe you experimented with Hadoop in the cloud, but now you're ready to build an on-premises cluster. This collection is for you.
ANON1246461923214
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ANON1246461923214,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2014 | 12:12:10 PM
Great article, What about Cloud?
Excellent article, would been interesting to balance these options versus cloud such as AWS's EMR, Azure, etc.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
4/24/2014 | 10:27:15 AM
X86 has a lock... for now
Talking to execs at Clouder and Hortonworks, it's pretty clear that Hadoop is 99.9% deployed on x86 today, with Intel providing the vast majority of the CPUs. Given those reports, it was interesting to read yesterday that IBM is planning to run Hadoop on its next-gen Power8 chips. That will no doubt require a few tweaks to the Hadoop software, which IBM can certianly do with its own BigInsights distribution, but I wonder if anybody will follow suit?

The whole idea with Hadoop is to rely on the software to gain power and redundancy by harnessing many low-cost servers. The entry price for a Power server quoted above is $7,500, whereas low-end X86 rack servers start at $2,500. Having many CPUs, not fewer, more powerful CPUs, is the design point of Hadoop software. I'm sure we'll see a good debate as IBM tries to give Hadoop a blue hue.


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