Comments
Microsoft Office For iPad Gains Printing
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asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
4/29/2014 | 5:04:17 PM
Cha-Ching
"All Office for iPad users can now read and print documents, but, as before, only those with Office 365 subscriptions can create and edit Word, Excel, or PowerPoint files."

 

Which most assuredly points to a market niche that possesses more money than brain matter since it is an indication of a willingness to be nickel/dimed to death.  
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 12:29:46 AM
Re: Cha-Ching

"Which most assuredly points to a market niche that possesses more money than brain matter since it is an indication of a willingness to be nickel/dimed to death."

 

Well, it points to Microsoft wanting to encourage people to move to a subscription-based model. Now, perhaps I have more money than brain matter, because I have an Office365 subscription. For $100 a year, I can install the full office suite on 5 computers (Mac or Windows) plus 5 mobile devices. Oh sure, it sucks to pay for that each year rather than having the software in perpituity, but then it's working out as a good deal for me because I'm able to use all those licenses, and it's sure as heck cheaper to pay for that and always have the latest version than to screw around like I have in the past and have different machines with different versions of Office running on them, depending on which versions I can upgrade at any time.

Of course, your situation may be different to mine. But I evaluated it, and with my big wallet and stupid brain, I decided it was the right choice for me.

Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 10:51:46 PM
Re: Cha-Ching
Eh.  My favorite version of Office was '97.  Dagnabbit.

(I hate the ribbon!)
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 11:01:30 PM
Re: Cha-Ching
I wasn't keen on the ribbon at first; I'm what I guess would be called a power user, so my life revolves around ALT-menukey shortcuts, and the ribbon hides things in STUPID places. More specifically, it is focused on providing functionality to regular users (which is fine if you're one of them) and thus makes it more difficult for people who actually know how to use Word properly. That sounds arrogant I suspect, but I promise that any power users will recognize what I'm saying - perhaps including yourself, Joe!

That said, the ability to code a customized ribbon has allowed me to write specialized tools to support templates and put all the best things in one place. It's simple stuff, all in VB.Net, and nothing I could do anywhere near as nicely in Word 2003.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
5/1/2014 | 12:34:54 AM
Re: Cha-Ching
@jgherbert: I do know what you're saying -- although, personally, I like to think of myself as a power user with a "regular person" mentality.  In any case, I do feel that UI changes like the ribbon tend to hurt the power users most while at the same time making it more difficult to become a power user.

(My favorite case in point -- the leap from MS-DOS 6.x/Windows 3.x to Windows 95/98.  I have fond memories of the days of MS-DOS when I knew *EVERYTHING* about my computer (and the few things I didn't know were easy and fun enough to experiment with and find out -- sometimes at the risk of very easily accidentally destroying everything, sure, but still).

I want UI changes to be a very clear improvement -- or, at least, not a clear detriment (beyond getting used to change).
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 11:05:36 PM
Re: Cha-Ching
That said, users of Office 2011 for Mac really got the short end of the stick on the ribbon.

Word 2011 has a set of ribbons.

Above that it has a bunch of common function icons.

Above that is the standard Menu Bar that I suspect is mandatory for all Mac apps.

Figuring out where stuff is just kills me. And, naturally, the ribbons are not the same as those in Word 2007 onwards. That would just be too easy. And you can't use the VB.Net tools to write custom ribbons because that is not supported on OSX. Yay.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
5/1/2014 | 12:37:33 AM
Re: Cha-Ching
@jgherbert: You just described my main problem with the Mac OSX platform.

The screen gets littered with so much crap, the Mac monitor becomes about as functionally effective as a PC monitor a full size smaller.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2014 | 4:30:10 AM
Re: Cha-Ching
This looks more like MS Office reader on iPad - without Office 365 subscription, you cannot do real editting. This somehow reveals MS strategy - facilitate the power of cloud computing in the backend and provide various access methods: web, mobile...


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