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Microsoft: Windows XP Update An 'Exception'
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Banacek
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Banacek,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/2/2014 | 12:40:40 PM
Re: Remind me again why Internet Explorer, itself, has anything to do with the Windows XP OS?
"No browser, not Chrome, not Firefox, not Opera, not Safari, etc., is considered part of the operating system."

Well, there you are wrong. As any knowledgable OS X user will tell you, Safari is a part of the OS. It comes with the OS. You can't really remove it. You can 'not use' it, but you could just as easily not use IE.

But, more importantly, Safari's engine, WebKit, IS a part of the OS, just like IE's engine is a part of Windows. It is used in many applications, and most people have no clue it is. For example, it's used to display mail content. And it is just as bad in OS X as it is in Windows. Because updating the browser to a new version (say go from Safari 4 to Safari 5) updates the OK because it updates Webkit (even though it doesn't have to, but Apple's people are too lazy to do it right). Which means, updating the browser literally can affect how your mail program views messages!

Oh, and you can get rid of IE from windows, big deal (sure, MS didn't want to because they wanted the market share for some reason). But you can't get rid of the engine without breaking a LOT of code.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
5/2/2014 | 9:17:55 AM
Re: Remind me again why Internet Explorer, itself, has anything to do with the Windows XP OS?
On the note of dual booting and running a *nix distribution, I would like to see numbers on how many Linux or BSD users are on a 15 year old release.  The same goes for OSX, how many users are sitting on a decade old version?  Why is it that Windows users will sit on an OS version seemingly forever?  Is it the cost of an OS upgrade?  Is it that things tend to break during upgrades?  How can Microsoft get the average Windows user to upgrade at the same pace that the average OSX or *nix user upgrades? 
Banickoss
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Banickoss,
User Rank: Strategist
5/1/2014 | 7:12:39 PM
Remind me again why Internet Explorer, itself, has anything to do with the Windows XP OS?
As we all know from our experience where Microsoft Marketing faked the courtroom proceedings, Internet Explorer has nothing, per se, to do with Windows XP. No browser, not Chrome, not Firefox, not Opera, not Safari, etc., is considered part of the operating system.

So, given that IE itself is simply an application, why wouldn't Microsoft patch a buggy application which is used by millions of its customers? The answer provided by Microsoft (that it's associated with the operating system) just doesn't hold water. As a professional in the software industry, I can symphathize with Microsoft's dilemma that Windows 7 & 8 don't offer enough value to entice half its users to switch, but, that's a different problem altogether than whether or not a browser application, which has nothing to do with the operating system, is to be patched.


Luckily, the advice stands to simply use Chrome or Firefox, and to dual boot Windows XP to Linux (typically Ubuntu), which, in and of itself, solves both problems immediately.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
5/1/2014 | 7:05:30 PM
A good reason to fix this bug...
The statement that this XP bug was fixed isn't really logical. It says the fix was authorized because the bug occurred so near the end of XP's life. Well, an end of life deadline is just that, unless there's a good reason not to follow through. In this case, as in the next one, the reason to fix a bug is because so many people are still using the operating system. 
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