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Internet Of Things: What's Holding Us Back
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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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5/9/2014 | 4:08:07 PM
Who Gets the Data?
An interesting idea that I didn't explore, that I heard in a follow-up chat this week with the folks at M2Mi (thanks Manu), was about who gets access to the Internet of things data. Jim Fowler, quoted in the article, talked about this at the IW Conference -- aobut how GE only gets access to power plant data if the customer continues to see the value in sharing it. But the M2Mi folks brought up other parties who will want access -- for example, the lender who owns a piece of equipment you're leasing, to make sure you're doing the maintenance so it'll have the expected residual value at lease end. A lot to think abot there in terms of who gets access to the data beyond the simple Maker-Owner.  
DanC364
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DanC364,
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5/7/2014 | 4:28:16 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
At Packet Dynamics we realized that the 'dark territory' or areas not covered by cellular M2M services exist not only in the U.S but also globally. Infrastructure players whether rail, pipeline, electrical transmission, etc. all need to communicate to end nodes that might never be covered by GSM/LTE. The Cloud can't just exist in the colored areas on AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint's coverage maps. 

We provide beyond-line-of-sight communications for M2M and cloud applications using High Frequency radio links.  We went back to HF, an old school spectrum that still works, and added the latest in radio technology (waveforms, error correction, etc) to solve real world industrial problems. It's not the glamorous side of the Cloud, but for companies with equipment scattered across the fly-over states or in third world countries it does solve a major problem.

Dan Conner

www.Packet-Dynamics.com
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
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5/7/2014 | 7:32:40 AM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
The really large IoT solutions will need the cloud to be truly effective but right now those solutions are few and far between.  I can't think of many companies that cover the area that Union Pacific covers with the need to monitor many points along the way.  Even companies like UPS or Fedex don't need to see the condition of every mile of road that they travel.  I think some government projects could become this big but if you're looking to track trucks for a medium sized company via GPS then moving to the cloud isn't going to be as critical for success.  
WKash
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WKash,
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5/6/2014 | 2:53:51 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
Insightful article, Chris. Unless you've been out to the remote areas where these pipelines and railines have been built, it's easy to underestimate just how far-flung and distant this infrastructure is -- and what it will take to develop sensors that would stay powered and in touch. But I sense the integration of data question may be equally challenging, and another reason why the IoT will work in some fields, and take much longer in others.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/6/2014 | 2:17:20 AM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
Without electricity, communications and the internet could not exist, without the internet, Cloud computing would not exist, I think that the majority of the IoT will need the Cloud. Hence, without the Cloud a lot of IoT's potential might not materialize. The inter-linked and dependent environment of technology might provide a break-through, but I feel that this break-through might just be written off as the normal pace of technological progress.
jayfriedmn
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jayfriedmn,
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5/5/2014 | 7:21:35 PM
FedEx for Data
Good perspectives.  IoT, especially in the industrial world is not as simple as a NEST appliance.  There are several considerations here:  the device, the data, the analytics, and then the data tranport mechanism.  On top of that, there are almost 2 billion legacy devices already spitting out data but until now there hasn't been an easy way to secure and backhaul that data.

The data transportation question, is equivalent to FedEx for packages.  An organization just wants to securely transport data from point A to point B.  You don't really care how the package (or data) gets there, just that it does on time.  And, most of todays sensors are also still serial devices - not IP-based.  

This is where virtual networks through software-defined architectures meets the Internet of things.  Virtualization makes the problem a whole lot easier to solve.  

 

Jay Friedman

Distrix (www.distrix.com)
SteveJ447
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SteveJ447,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2014 | 5:20:41 PM
Delivering the data
Interesting that the focus is mostly on the edge (e.g. sensors) and the centre (e.g. cloud-based analytics) without much discussion of the data-sharing infrastructure needed to support any end-to-end system.

Whether the system designer leans-toward sensor-based (edge) computation or, alternatively, 'thin' apps connected via a cloud service, it is inevitable that both will be required in any business-critical system, and furthermore, device-to-device data-sharing (e.g. for local real-time control) will often be required too (e.g. when the latencies to/from the cloud are too long). So a lot more attention needs to be given to the real-time data-sharing platforms that will be needed to underpin and enable these IoT systems. Many system designers will recognize this as the 'elephant in the room' since commentators tend to focus on: 1/ smart sensors and 2/ big-data analytics, while assuming some kind of wireless connectively alone is sufficient for real-time data-sharing. Fortunately the technology exists (e.g. the OMG's DDS specification) and is standardized and proven. Hopefully we'll start to see a lot more discussion of the system infrastructure...rather than just the data sources and sinks that it connects. Ubiquitous, real-time, secure data availability won't just happen.              
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
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5/5/2014 | 5:03:32 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
We need a bandwidth breakthrough, also. Bonus points for connecting Iron Man to this debate.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/5/2014 | 4:57:11 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
The power limitation is definitely true, Tom. One difference from smartphones is that industrial uses often involve relatively low power demands -- sending small bits of data back, but needing to stay powered over many months because replacing/recharging is difficult.  
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
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5/5/2014 | 4:51:32 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
I find it interesting that the IoT is hobbled by the same thing that limits smartphones: power. We need a breakthrough in power storage and generation that improves current technology by an order of magnitude, something along the lines of Iron Man's arc reactor.
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