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Internet Of Things: What's Holding Us Back
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/5/2014 | 10:57:28 AM
IoT software vs. hardware
Tennison's story about asking analytics software vendors to solve his sensor hardware problem is striking. It makes me wonder if we are much further along on the software side than the hardware side regarding IoT.

Also his problem is specialized to the railroad industry -- and there will be examples that need to be customized for every vertical. How will sensor manufacturers achieve affordable scale? Lots of interesting food for thought here.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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5/5/2014 | 11:34:27 AM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
The lack of deep concern about analytical capabilities was one of the biggest surprises to me from the reporting in this article. If others have had a different experience, glad to hear about it.

In terms of sensors, we'll see about how much industry-specific adaptation is needed. Bill Ruh of GE noted that in the mechanical world, measuring vibration is something of a universal need -- it's rarely a good thing with machines. However, not all the innovation in sensors will be hardware driven -- virtual sensors, or software-based sensors that combine inputs from multiple sensors, will emerge as companies needs get more sophisticated.   

 
mnamboodiri
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mnamboodiri,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2014 | 1:49:29 PM
IoT with more capable platforms
Chris - interesting article. I think the way we will be able to address some of this complexity and integration challenges is with the platform (or middleware) taking up a larger burden. If we continue to custom build each solution (as the article describes we do today) with massive integration efforts, security, burdened devices and heavy apps that have to embed connectivity, networking, data massaging, QoS etc, it will be a long time before we get to 50 billion useful connected devices! 

I believe some of the burden will be delegated to platforms that can then enable more focused devices and "thin" apps - while providing the networking, security, contextual intelligencem modularity, data flow/access and APIs to build solutions faster. 

-Manu
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/5/2014 | 2:17:46 PM
Re: IoT with more capable platforms
Manu, thanks for the perspective. It does seem like there's a role for a management platform in here somewhere that is still evolving today. 
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
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5/5/2014 | 3:51:42 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
I'm surprised about the lack of concern about analytical capabilities too. The security industry has been wrestling for years about how to identify actionable information from massive quantities of data. Maybe with IoT you're dealing with a small subset of known data types (pressure, temperature, vibration, etc), which makes it less about needles and haystacks.
Todder
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Todder,
User Rank: Moderator
5/5/2014 | 4:34:00 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
The railway and oil industry requirements are the same for the most part (like any other industry, resource-based or other that are remote from urbanania).

Remote locations, little WiFi, power in short supply, and the environmental challanges. Solar powered units would resolve some of this potentially but you also need some fail safes built in to any IoT application. Like when the power to traffic lights goes off at an intersection, you can get a Bobby to manually direct traffic. Any implementation requires an audit trail of real-time testing that it is working and a backup (tested to fall over to when it isn't).
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
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5/5/2014 | 4:51:32 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
I find it interesting that the IoT is hobbled by the same thing that limits smartphones: power. We need a breakthrough in power storage and generation that improves current technology by an order of magnitude, something along the lines of Iron Man's arc reactor.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/5/2014 | 4:57:11 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
The power limitation is definitely true, Tom. One difference from smartphones is that industrial uses often involve relatively low power demands -- sending small bits of data back, but needing to stay powered over many months because replacing/recharging is difficult.  
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/5/2014 | 5:03:32 PM
Re: IoT software vs. hardware
We need a bandwidth breakthrough, also. Bonus points for connecting Iron Man to this debate.
SteveJ447
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SteveJ447,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/5/2014 | 5:20:41 PM
Delivering the data
Interesting that the focus is mostly on the edge (e.g. sensors) and the centre (e.g. cloud-based analytics) without much discussion of the data-sharing infrastructure needed to support any end-to-end system.

Whether the system designer leans-toward sensor-based (edge) computation or, alternatively, 'thin' apps connected via a cloud service, it is inevitable that both will be required in any business-critical system, and furthermore, device-to-device data-sharing (e.g. for local real-time control) will often be required too (e.g. when the latencies to/from the cloud are too long). So a lot more attention needs to be given to the real-time data-sharing platforms that will be needed to underpin and enable these IoT systems. Many system designers will recognize this as the 'elephant in the room' since commentators tend to focus on: 1/ smart sensors and 2/ big-data analytics, while assuming some kind of wireless connectively alone is sufficient for real-time data-sharing. Fortunately the technology exists (e.g. the OMG's DDS specification) and is standardized and proven. Hopefully we'll start to see a lot more discussion of the system infrastructure...rather than just the data sources and sinks that it connects. Ubiquitous, real-time, secure data availability won't just happen.              
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