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10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
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GoodCat206
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GoodCat206,
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1/21/2012 | 4:27:13 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Sure it's not too smart to write things like, "Gee I am SO bored today." But the real question is, why are so many talented people working in jobs that require so much meaningless face time? Why doesn't the company find ways to keep their people challenged and motivated?
sdevinelon
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sdevinelon,
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1/4/2012 | 1:55:48 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Whilst I would agree with your points concerning company confidentiality it's interesting to note that all this seems to bring out the worst in us with respect to prejudices and petty likes/dislikes. In reality, people are rarely as straightforward or one dimensional as reading a few facebook comments or tweets may suggest. And the trick that companies as a whole are missing is that there is an incredible amount of information to be mined concerning the true wellbeing of their workforce from social networks e.g. Employee Satisfaction normally suggest everything is hunky dory when in fact the reality is somewhat different. Would it not be beneficial to allow this type of feedback to be leveraged without penalty?
SA22
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SA22,
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1/4/2012 | 5:56:56 AM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
While I agree with most of what you say, I find it hillarious that you recommend having an alias at every turn. What's the point, I mean really? If you are simply going to put on a facade for the masses, why bother? The bottom line is... I post business, I post my personal opinon on social issues and I post reality in my life. Now, I am very competant at my job, and certainly don't go bashing my co. or my competition, however instead of alias, how about we consider that people are human... that in reality I don't care who you follow - if you are good at your job and passionate, I would much prefer the honesty of your personal opinons that a 'resume' on social networking sites.

The whole idea of social is to open doors to new ideas and to build acceptance of each other - no matter what your opinion on the next election, the latest sex scandal or who you choose to follow.

While I get the jest of what you are trying to say - I am truly disheartened by the suggestion that you show one face to these people and another to 'others'.

How about we begin to learn diversity, differences, lifestyle choices.
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
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1/3/2012 | 11:33:34 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Thanks, Brian. I just wonder if you CAN separate your personal from professional lives these days.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
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1/3/2012 | 11:32:38 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Thank you for the insight! I think there is no such thing as a social DMZ when it comes to venting about your job (past, present or future) on social media.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
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1/3/2012 | 11:31:59 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Thank you for the insight!

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
Bprince
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Bprince,
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1/3/2012 | 11:13:26 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
These posts to me are more of an argument to either not have an account or to not "friend" anyone at work. The other possibility is to have more than one profile, with the second being a more personal one for select friends and family only, thereby clearly delineating your professional and personal life.
Brian Prince, InformationWeek/Dark Reading Comment Moderator
TreeInMyCube
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TreeInMyCube,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2012 | 9:38:28 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Number (5) in the comment below should be listed first; it's the most important. Separate any posting you are doing professionally, or as a part of your job, from your personal/family/friends posting. My employer doesn't want to see cute pictures of my kids, and my cousins don't care about my work experience on sites like LinkedIn. I agree with the suggestions in the post by Ms. Donston-Miller. On your personal social networking page, you can express anger and frustration, as well as happiness or sadness. Life is not all rainbows and unicorns, of course, but it is possible for your boss or HR to (eventually) access some of your postings. Don't post things that are damaging to your friends, colleagues, or your employer.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2012 | 9:12:12 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
OOOPS, I forgot something in my other post. DO NOT post your own picture. You may use a pet, cartoon character or other image that tickles your fancy.
Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2012 | 8:52:00 PM
re: 10 Social Networking Posts That Sink Careers
Very correct, EVERYTHING counts and nothing is ever forgotten. A few tips for the healthily paranoid: (1) Use a disposable e-mail account to set up your social networking site. (2) The name of the account should be as anonymous as your password. (3) Use a pseudonym / 'pen name' for your social account name. (4) Remember that the friends listed on your account reflect on you as much as the content of your account (do you really want your employer to know that you are friended with Casey Anthony, for example? (5) Use separate accounts under different names for pure family, professional relationships and casual friends / acquaintances. Do not mingle them. (6) Go back over all of your existing posts and edit out anything that would embarrass your mother at a church social. - You get the drift. (Last) Remember, being 'cool' could just possibly get you kicked off an airplane flight. Have a great New Year !


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