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Wearables Plus IoT: Preparing Amid Paranoia
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/12/2014 | 9:37:33 AM
Disney and wearables
Will the Disney wearables be more about discounts -- or yet another nudge from Disney to pay more? We shall see. See Problems I'd Like New Disney Tech To Solve.
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
5/12/2014 | 11:24:22 AM
Re: Disney and wearables
My guess is that it's Disney making it easier to sell more. Anything that streamlines payment -- tap a wristband against a device instead of digging through pockets for a wallet and then swiping a card -- is probably a good thing in Disney's eyes.

I also don't find the Magic Band to be all that creepy, which surprises me given that I'm a curmudgeon about wearables and IoT. Disney is already a highly controlled, highly monitored environment. It's also a limited environment: once I'm out of the park, the band comes off and the roving eye of Mickey turns elsewhere.

When you're spending hours in the blazing sun, standing in line, navigating crowds, and wrangling sugar-addled children, a wearable that makes the experience even slighty more convenient would be welcome.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/12/2014 | 3:45:32 PM
Re: Disney and wearables
I don't find the wristband creepy in the monitoring sense. I do feel it is largely about adding incremental revenue.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
5/12/2014 | 5:13:09 PM
Re: Disney and wearables
Doesn't Disney deserve that incremental revenue if they've created an opt-in service that people find useful and convenient? 
smallbizwiz
IW Pick
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smallbizwiz,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/12/2014 | 9:43:51 PM
Re: Disney and wearables
Nice article.

I like that Information Week is talking about applications of RFID beyond the tech basics.  I hope that the discussion goes to the next level.  Marketing sites (e.g. iMedia) picking up useful applications, tourist areas (e.g. Visit Tampa Bay) promoting usage throughout a geographical area, or full end-to-end consumer supply chains (e.g. HP printer tagged - delivered to Walmart - used at home to hook up to NFC phone for automatic printing).

I agree that privacay is the biggest hurdle. Luckily Facebook has broken that hurdle down substantially.  Aside from cost (which really isn't a big barrier anymore), the next thing is utilizing RFID to its fullest potential - not just a pointer to more data on the Internet.  That was the biggest failing of QR codes; it's more than a pointer.  As an aside, did you know that you can fit nearly an entire newspaper article on a QR code?  Why do nearly 100% simply take you to a website?  

Like lemmings off a cliff, we're afraid to try something new.  RFID is [kind of] new (i.e. trendy) right now.  Let's not follow this Internet of Things path.  Let's take it in a direction that can actually benefit the consumer community as a whole.

RFID tags are stand alone databases that can be updated on-the-fly.  Where it can go from there, I don't know, but I know that thinking of it as a pointer to the internet is stupid - we already have that technology.
majenkins
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majenkins,
User Rank: Moderator
5/12/2014 | 1:19:12 PM
NoT
My new mission in all of these articles is to do away with the inaccurate term/phrase "Internet of Things". An internet is by definition a network of networks, and since the things we are talking about whether is it wrist bands or refrigerators are not networks they are nodes on "a network. Therefore the "Internet of Things" people keep talking about is really a network of things NoT. I think the new acronym is more appropriate to the overhype as well.
smallbizwiz
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smallbizwiz,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/12/2014 | 9:30:45 PM
Re: NoT
I couldn't agree more with Internet of Things term.  

The power of RFID isn't about being part of the a part of a network at all.  It's the exact opposite.  It's about having on-demand data, everywhere about everything.  It's about being able to ascertain [and update] information with simply an interrogator and transponder.  

It's just like reading a street sign, but with gobs and gobs of data behind.  To further that analogy, calling RFID part of the Internet of Things is like reading a street sign and looking up each word in a dictionary to understand its meaning.  Utilizing RFID with all its power is being able to comprehend the entire sign in a moment's glance - much more powerful.

 


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