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Do You Work In The Technology Ghetto?
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JoeL580
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JoeL580,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/13/2014 | 10:47:10 AM
Working conditions
Your photo of workers in cubicle reminds me of many of the jobs as a temp worker that I have had with various Microsoft divisions.

At Microsoft the goal was to put each employee in his or her own room with a closed door. For the most part this is what happened although temp workers were placed 2 to a room. At one time at MSN they just ran out of building space and had us working in the hallways and under staircases. But it was soon fixed with more constructing more buildings. (There are over 250 Microsoft building in Redmond, Washington, 20 cafeterias, and 70 busses.)

Microsoft had it pluses which were high pay for temp workers (at least), subsidized cafeterias with great food, free parking, bus transportation between buildings, and tremendouse technology resources internally.

The negatives were the often long boring and too many meetings. There also were too many brillant intelligent bosses who could pass tricky interview questions but had no clue as to chat customers wanted. Many of the programmers were great at implementation but not in innovation which is probably why Microsoft is always late to new technology - and also has its failures like Vista and smartphones.

Overall Microsoft was a great learing experience and not much like the article complains of.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/13/2014 | 4:22:26 PM
don't forget
>The most important factors in accomplishment and personal satisfaction were autonomy, mastery, and purpose, Pink wrote.

Don't forget good management. Reporting to a bad manager can sour the best employment situation. It's too bad job interviews often don't reveal the sort of person one will be working under.


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