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Yammer And The Freemium Trap
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SMUKHERJEE2102
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SMUKHERJEE2102,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2012 | 1:00:55 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Yammer is a good product, and in future business social networks like ApnaCircle, Viadeo etc will need to follow its path towards gaining more acceptance in the corporate world, besides exploring this area of revenue generation!
FZEBITZ250
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FZEBITZ250,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2012 | 11:12:51 AM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Thank you, that is good to hear.
JMATKINSE14
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JMATKINSE14,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2012 | 10:28:09 AM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
That's not true, In the Freemium version users are allowed to remove people who have left the organisation from their network
FZEBITZ250
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FZEBITZ250,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2012 | 8:12:04 AM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
An onther issue with the freemium account is that when an employee leaves a company he can still access the company Yammer-feed. Seen from a company perspective this can be quite scary, if some of your employees are to join your competitor, but still have access to all the information shared. In that case all you can do as a CIO is to hope that Yammer is only used for social talk and not business.
Cynthia B
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Cynthia B,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/12/2012 | 7:25:47 AM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Benefits of Yammer aside, if a company does not want its employees on Yammer, all that the company needs to do is send an email to the employees banning Yammer, and then have someone - let's call him Bob the Destroyer - join @unfuncompany.com's network. Bob the Destroyer's job is to take names. You post to Yammer, you get fired.

I imagine that such an approach would swiftly kill the offending Yammer network.
Lawrence De Voe
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Lawrence De Voe,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/11/2012 | 9:52:25 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
I can understand where these concerns are coming from, but in my own experience, Yammer's Freemium offering was a huge benefit. The model allowed us to run Yammer in pilot mode at no cost when we were considering an Enterprise Social Media platform for our business (and the momentum our Pilot created carried us forward through a successful Premium rollout).

There are a lot of technologies like this out there that can be misused: personal cell phones, iPads, email, photocopiers, Facebook, Google+, Dropbox, YouSendIt, etc. As a technology leader, if you discover that a significant segment of your business is deriving value from an unsanctioned technology offering, you've uncovered an opportunity. Either you have a corporate alternative in place and you have a chance to migrate these users into the corporate fold, or you have stakeholders and sponsors for a new project to help make your business more successful. The business landscape today is full of opportunities like this for us to do better as technology leaders.
DSACKS941
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DSACKS941,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/11/2012 | 6:47:59 PM
re: Yammer And The Freemium Trap
Hi David - We appreciate your perspective on this, but as you could probably tell from your conversation with Wayne Shurts of SuperValu (http://bit.ly/zw23jV), CIOs are beginning to recognize that social is different. It requires voluntary participation -- you can't force people to share. Our customers understand that there is a huge benefit to having your employees organically choose and adopt their internal social network since their voluntary and enthusiastic participation is the key to success. We have countless examples of customers who have embraced this, including a large online retailer whose IT executives allowed employees to choose between Yammer and their existing solution (they chose Yammer). One of our largest customers initially chose a Yammer competitor but came to us two years later after millions of dollars and significant time spent in a failed attempt to push engagement. Because a voluntary Yammer network in a different geography was thriving, they came back to Yammer and ended up rolling it out company-wide on a short timeline with great success. You may remember that in 2010, Gartner predicted over 70 percent of IT-mandated social media initiatives will fail (http://www.gartner.com/it/page.... CIOs now see voluntary (viral) adoption as a way to set up a social initiative for success and the freemium model as a great way to de-risk the value proposition for them so they don't have to pay anything until the adoption of the product in their enterprise is proven.

Regards,

David Sacks
CEO, Yammer
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