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Throwback Thursday: This Old PC
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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 6:18:21 PM
Re: Amstrad Notepad
That Tandy is clearly a later version of the Radio Shack (same company) TRS-80. And I, too, remember XyWrite... great, fast word processor. Brings back memories of floppy disks and command-line operations.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 6:16:38 PM
HP 200LX- Trusted companion


Back in 1994, HP launched a series of impressive Palmtop computers, including this HP 200LX, that let you work with Lotus 1-2-3 files, write/edit Word docs, plot intricate math forumlas on a graph, and manage tons of tasks with a powerful database engine, including a feature-rich calendar and address book, all on 1 MB (and later 4 MB) of memory.  It's not as old and venerable as some of the other PCs readers have posted, but it was a brilliantly engineered portable computer in its day and a trusted companion for many years.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 5:37:57 PM
Re: Amstrad Notepad
Great pics, keep them coming! PS: I should have known XyWrite would come up.
ErnieSchell
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ErnieSchell,
User Rank: Strategist
5/15/2014 | 5:02:05 PM
Amstrad Notepad
This 1990s Tandy 102 "laptop" is 1" thick and 8.5 x 11" with a serial port and a parallel printer port. Came in handy (yes, that rhymes with Tandy). Great battery life (about 30 hours). Not very heavy, either. I used to offload all kinds of text files to XyWrite on my PC and reformat as needed.

http://www.schell.com/tandy.jpg

I also had an HP Jornada handheld with a keyboard and screen that was kind of a proto-Smartphone (without the phone...). On the front right side you can see the end of the stylus used to draw on the screen if you wanted to illustrate your text with a rendering or line drawing. This weighed a couple of pounds, but was only aboout 4x8" and ran Windows CE. I once left it in a plane seat pocket, and had to have it retrieved for me after I had left the plane. I still have a folder in my archives of the several hundred lengthy notes I kept and updated on this handy device.

HP Jornada 720 Handheld PC
anon6207829264
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anon6207829264,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 3:38:40 PM
This still resides in my father's basement
Kim-1

I got this as a gift in 1977, and never got rid of it. Who needs an OS when you can program bare metal in hex. It might be primitive, but it taught great coding, I had a chess program for it that ran in 1100 bytes!

 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
5/15/2014 | 12:52:15 PM
Commodore 64
Gee, if I'd have known this article was coming I wouldn't thrown the C-64 out I found in box in basement about 5 years ago. I remember buying that when going to college for Comp Sci,  thinking I'd learn how to write video games. You could use Basic to control up to 8 sprites. I quickly learned that type of programming was not much fun. :-)

ANON1247493318178
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ANON1247493318178,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 12:44:36 PM
TI-99 setup
Finally got rid of this rig just before I retired last year, but I did some serious computing on this TI-99, complete with external hard drive (10 K as I recall).  I bought it while working in the Pentagon and first used it to calculate a manpower reduction

Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 12:42:05 PM
It was shocking how fast they disappeared
I don't have a picture of a Texas Instruments 99/4a. They attached to a television set so you didn't have to buy a monitor. They looked something like a modern laptop, a low and sleek silver box. It was shocking how quickly they disappeared. Somehow, Texas Instrucments produced a batch that could deliver electrical shocks off the keyboard to their users and 99/4a model couldn't be resuscitated after that. 
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 12:13:05 PM
Back in '08
A 2008 Toshiba Satellite laptop running Windows Vista (upgraded to Windows 7 of course). Hey this is old by technology standards.

Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/15/2014 | 11:53:13 AM
Re: Another Radio Shack Winner & Journalist's Friend
I seem to recall that Apple II. My father brought it -- or something that looked just like it --home one day when he was trying to learn how to use it. 
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