Comments
Adobe Creative Cloud Crashes, Is Restored
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
melakfilms2011
50%
50%
melakfilms2011,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 3:16:23 AM
Re: Hogwash
Adobe's Cloud issues move focus away from the acutal reason many long-time Adobe product users are upset. The trivialities regarding login failure and the fact most could still work has never been the issue. The issue is that we don't want to pay a monthly fee for eternity for products we could once own and use whether enjoying economic growth in our lives or trying to stretch every nickel during the harsh. Software is a tool. It is not cable TV, nor is it a gardener or a newspaper subscription. Those things offer consistant service to their customers. The gardender turns up once a week to mow the law, trim the hedges. There's a completely different newspaper with all-new news upon each page on your doorstep every day of the week. They are services. Software is, for the most part, static. Aside from periodic updates to fix issues or add drivers, software versions rarely add on an amazing change until a new release comes out. I look at my Adobe products as tools through which I make money. They rarely change in some massive way. They are there when I require them whether I'm working or trying to create something that might garner me work. Software, whether Office or Adobe Creative Suite, are toolboxes we open up when we need a hammer. Oh my God, I just realized - Home Depot will soon start charging us monthly under their new "Tools As Service" plan. I can't wait.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
5/19/2014 | 4:57:00 PM
Re: Hogwash -- and when a cloud isn't really a cloud
As I acknowleded in an author's note and several comments below the article, it's clear that Adobe's Creative cloud isn't as cloudy as billed. It's really just a collection of desktop apps with a thin layer of cloud connection for license verification and updates. It's not quite clear what aspect of this cloud is mission critical, but it's obvious -- as acknowleged -- that the vast majority of these creative types could continue working locally even if they couldn't sign in to the "Creative Cloud."

 
anon9267987092
50%
50%
anon9267987092,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/18/2014 | 8:36:47 PM
Re: Lawsuit! -- nonsense
You write nonsense.  Read the news report again, while paying attention.  Only users needing to log in to PCC may've experienced a problem, meaning a small fraction of the total, not all users.
anon9267987092
50%
50%
anon9267987092,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/18/2014 | 8:32:51 PM
Hogwash
JOURNALISTIC HOGWASH:  "Whether you call it a cloud outage or log-in issue, the bottom line of this week's incident is that more than 1 million illustrators, photographers, designers, developers, and other creative types were potentially unable to do their jobs."  

Even as the news media worker writes, only a fraction of the PCC users would experience the outage:

"The failure happened during database maintenance activity and affected services that require users to log in with an Adobe ID."  Some small fraction of ttal users may've had to log in.

Weasling with the qualifier word "potentially" allowed the news media worker to pen his overstatement.  Shame on his butt.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
5/16/2014 | 7:13:14 PM
Caught in the act of cloud washing
Use of the term cloud, as in Adobe Creative Cloud, is like calling Microsoft Windows updates a hybrid cloud operation. It's not. Adobe users experienced login failure as a result of "database maintenance activity," an explanation that leaves out more than it explains. Adobe must have somehow corrupted data in its production identity management system to suspend so much log-in activity for so long. Then it took a long time to restore it. If that maintenance activity had been occurring in a true cloud fashion, there would have been an uncorrupted copy of the data readily available. It's a cloud, in Adobe parlance, until it fails. Then it is clearly not a cloud.

 
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
5/16/2014 | 3:14:03 PM
Re: Lawsuit!
Hold your horses there, bub. Turns out the log-on snafu didn't necessarily prevent users from using their tools locally. Just how many were impacted is unclear, as monthly subscribers can continue to use apps for 30 days and annual members up to 99 days without having to log into the cloud to reverify the status of their subscriptions. For enterprises and SMEs, the cloud introduces centralized app-management and cross-tool workflows that may have seen more of an impact by this login problem.

If the impact was minimal, it's pretty clear the Creative "Cloud" is a bit of a cloud wash. If the impact was more severe -- I haven't seen or been able to score any interivews with Creative Cloud customers -- it's another example of beyond-customer-control cloud vulnerability. In my book, enterprise data centers are more likely to go down than cloud data centers. On the other hand, desktop apps are as reliable as the PCs they're installed on.
JanetA472
50%
50%
JanetA472,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/16/2014 | 1:36:15 PM
Lawsuit!
Not a fan of the "Cloud". Maybe Adobe needs to be zapped with a nice little class action lawsuit. A million creative people lose work for a day, times an average of $100 per day income, comes out to somewhere around $100,000,000. Hmmm.
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
5/16/2014 | 1:24:27 PM
Re: Slooooow
That makes much more sense, Doug. Quark has long done the same sort of verification. As long as the licensing "fails open" if cloud system is down, fine. If people can't work, well ...

And yes, it smells like "cloudwashing" for sure.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
5/16/2014 | 1:08:33 PM
Re: Slooooow
It's a hybrid cloud approach with software deployed on the desktop but software updates, asset uploads and login handled centrally in the cloud.

FAQ: "Do I always need an internet connection?"

Adobe Answer: No. Your Creative Cloud desktop applications (such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator) are installed directly on your computer, so you won't need an ongoing Internet connection to use them on a daily basis. An Internet connection is required the first time you install and license your desktop apps, but you can use the apps in offline mode with a valid software license. The desktop apps will attempt to validate your software licenses every 30 days. For annual members, you can use the apps for up to 99 days in offline mode. Month-to-month members can use the software for up to 30 days in offline mode.

So it's pretty clear the outage wasn't as dire for many as advertized. But it also makes the "cloud" billing sound like marketecture. No wonder the already have 1.84 million "subscribers" after just two years or so on this push. Sounds like it's mainly a conversion to subscription licensing.
GaryB230
100%
0%
GaryB230,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/16/2014 | 1:02:35 PM
Re: Not Great
It's not a hosted application it's local.  Lightroom and Photoshop run on your box but you need to occasionaly log into adobe to confirm you are paid up. 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.