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EHR Adoption A Success, Says ONC Leader
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Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/19/2014 | 12:04:03 PM
Re: ehr
@Alison I agree with you 100%. It makes no sense to me that individuals are not granted ownership of their own health data.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/19/2014 | 11:57:42 AM
Re: ehr
That's one reason I'm a huge advocate for patient ownership of his/her own health record; transparency, and a simple way for patients to correct errors on their records. So far, I don't think this is the case, unfortunately, but it's going to become a really big problem in the future.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/19/2014 | 10:07:36 AM
Re: ehr
@Alison yes, it has great potential for much greater efficiency. But there is a downside, as well. Last year's report from the Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI), TOP 10 HEALTH TECHNOLOGY HAZARDS FOR 2013 warned of the potential for a single error on a health record spreading before it is caught and corrected. because a single error in patient data "can have far-reaching consequences, leading to a host of downstream effects that" are challenging to detect and complicated to set right. Should a doctor act on the wrong information before it is discovered, there may be irrevocable damage.

 That is not to say that people should give up on EHR, only to take some precautions. for example, the report recommended  disassociatiing any device that uploads data when switching from patient to patient. While that sounds simple enough, it may not be the default for "location-centricy" operations, which connects the data to the room rather than the individual.  In such a system, when the patient is moved, the system has to be manually updated. 
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/19/2014 | 9:28:10 AM
Re: ehr
Yes, the latest data says 93% of hospitals have some level of EMR installed. Now, that doesn't necessarily mean use is widespread, of course. Nor does it mean hospitals are fully leveraging this investment. But it's a good foundation. Physician offices have much lower adoption, unsurprisingly. Personally, I think the availability of cloud-based EHRs increases the odds of faster EMR adoption within practices; it's easier, often more affordable, and requires less internal IT knowledge. 

As you say, Ariella, now hospitals have EMRs in place they're digging in to the data to try and discover new ways to reduce costs and improve care. (I'm writing a story on that later today, based on the Crimson conference I attended late last week.) Once you've invested so many resources into such a massive data repository, you want to fully leverage this amazing asset!
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/16/2014 | 4:02:59 PM
ehr
93% of hospitals? Wow, they've made pretty good progress. About a year ago I wrote about EHR adoption in NYC, something that Bloomberg encouraged. One of the things I came across was the report  Using Electronic Health Records to Improve Quality and Efficiency: The Experiences of Leading Hospitals. It points to additional benefits associated with EHR.  On a macro-level, EHRs make it possible to identify "patterns in performance data to identify problem areas, thereby facilitating quality improvement efforts and identifying opportunities for process redesign."  The EHRs also contribute to the data that can be used to investigate "questions and test hypotheses," whether they relate to general efficiency or clinical issues.  


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